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-   -   2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS: Suspension Walkaround (http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105950)

franknbeans 09-14-2010 09:01 PM

2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS: Suspension Walkaround
 
Found this link . . . good read.

http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...alkaround.html




By Dan Edmunds | March 23, 2010
http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x478.jpg
I'm tired of unintended acceleration. I want to get back to talking about acceleration that is fully intended (and appreciated) and the cars that are built to manage it well. What better way to take the automotive equivalent of a Silkwood Shower than a suspension walkaround of our 2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS?
Let's get right to it, shall we?

http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Up front, there's a coil-over MacPherson strut.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
But the lower end does not have the single L-shaped lower arm that most strut suspensions have. Instead, there are two lower links (white), each with its own ball joint, just like the closely-related Pontiac G8 GT.

The front stabilizer bar (green) connects to the strut body via a long, slender link (yellow) for a 1:1 motion ratio.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Like most cars with north-south engines and rear-wheel drive, the Camaro's steering arm (yellow) acts ahead of the axle centerline. The hub carrier it attaches to (white) is aluminum, unlike the Pontiac G8, which uses one made of steel.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Here's a closer look at the dual lower links and their ball joints. The forward one (yellow) comes in from above so that the steering arm can sneak past underneath.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Them's some big brakes - much bigger than the 2-piston sliding calipers found on the front of our dearly departed G8 GT. These calipers (green) are 4-piston fixed units from Brembo. A clump of mass-damping weights (white) have been unceremoniously stuck to them (where they don't show much), presumably to quell a resonant vibration. The ventilated rotors (yellow) are 1-piece cast units.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x476.jpg
Out back, the rear multi-link suspension looks very, very similar to that found in the G8 GT. Like the Pontiac, "multi" in this case means three links and one L-shaped upper arm.
Two links (green forward, red aft, behind the shock) make up what amounts to a lower wishbone. The fully boxed upper arm (white) curves off behind the shock to meet its hidden second pivot. A toe-link (yellow) keeps the wheel pointed in the right direction.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Here's a snail's-eye view of the lower links and their wishbonesque arrangement.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Left to right (and bottom to top): forward lower link (yellow); toe link (green); and upper arm (white). The forward upper pivot of the upper arm, a pillow ball, is just barely visible. The rear pivot is a higher volume rubber bushing that's hidden off behind the spring and shock.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
The rear lower link does quite a bit of work as the spring/shock assembly and the stabilizer bar connect to it. The shape is slightly different from that of the G8 GT, but it's very close. The stab bar motion ratio looks about the same(0.4:1), but the spring/shock motion ratio looks a little smaller (0.7:1).




http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Like the front, the Camaro's rear knuckles (yellow) are made of aluminum. Those of the Pontiac G8 GT are steel. They also house ginormous 4-piston fixed Brembo calipers of an open design for easy pad swaps and an external crossover tube (black) to send fluid to the outer pair of pistons.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
That'll do.



http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtest...mb-717x477.jpg
Front tires: 245/45ZR20 (103Y), weighing in at 63.0 pounds
Rear tires: 275/40ZR20 (106Y), weighing in at 67.5 pounds.

sunsfan 09-14-2010 10:14 PM

nice find some good info and pics.

MillerTime 09-15-2010 02:39 AM

Very informative. Thanks for the info!

JusticePete 09-17-2010 10:31 AM

You made a valuable post to a link that gives a good overview of the ZETA II suspension. If you found the material interesting I think you will enjoy these two threads.

ZETA II Suspension -- The Book

GM Designs in Chassis Strength / Crash Test Videos

dmiller66 09-19-2010 03:35 PM

Great article. However, I was a little disappointed when I took off one of my wheel and saw "Made in China" on my "Chevrolet".

khabboub 09-19-2010 04:54 PM

is this the same and/or similar to the v6?

pincoin 09-19-2010 05:09 PM

Thanks for the info!

BLUESMOKE69 09-19-2010 05:54 PM

Keep the lessons coming!!! Super Cool Stuff!!

Tech 09-19-2010 06:39 PM

thanks for taking the time...now to replace 90% of it with aftermarket parts!

franknbeans 09-19-2010 06:57 PM

Nice, my second homepage post.

iPODFAN11 09-19-2010 07:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dmiller66 (Post 2346828)
Great article. However, I was a little disappointed when I took off one of my wheel and saw "Made in China" on my "Chevrolet".

Saw the same on a 2010 Equinox. Emailed Chevy...

...got this in response...

Quote:

Thank you for contacting us recently regarding outsourcing of parts. We appreciate you advising General Motors of your concerns and providing us the opportunity to review them, as we recognize individuals have many different views.


General Motors is present in different parts of the world. Thatís what makes GM a global company, and as such, utilizes manufacturing capabilities overseas. Rest assured that our vehicles are as reliable as any products on the market. At General Motors, we have such confidence in the vehicles that we produce that we provide a comprehensive warranty to protect our customers. We constantly monitor current procedures to ensure quality is built into all of our vehicles. We also watch closely for technological innovations which may be utilized in improving and reinforcing the quality of our products.


We have documented your concerns and will forward your comments to the appropriate department. Your thoughts and opinions are very important to us. Thank you again for taking the time to let us know how you feel.


Sincerely,


The General Motors Consumer Support Team

wrbear 09-19-2010 07:38 PM

You the man!

mdinferno 09-19-2010 09:11 PM

excellent post

JoeFire 09-19-2010 11:46 PM

Great post. It's always nice to learn more about what we drive around in.

jmaryt 09-20-2010 12:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iPODFAN11 (Post 2347230)
Saw the same on a 2010 Equinox. Emailed Chevy...

...got this in response...

that's all well and good,however saying that the parts are 'as good" as anything on the market is NOT CONFIDENCE INSPIRING,because everything made today has a made in china label attached,and it is common knowledge that things produced in china are made very "economically",and have been determined to have "quality control" issues!..it makes me feel uncomfortable as well,but harley davidson has some parts made in china too,and who woulda thunk?

Camaro_h 09-20-2010 04:52 AM

Thanks for the technical info.

DON_RAFA 09-20-2010 08:51 AM

Your work is much appreciated, thanks for the detailed info!

axis 09-20-2010 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmaryt (Post 2348221)
that's all well and good,however saying that the parts are 'as good" as anything on the market is NOT CONFIDENCE INSPIRING,because everything made today has a made in china label attached,and it is common knowledge that things produced in china are made very "economically",and have been determined to have "quality control" issues!..it makes me feel uncomfortable as well,but harley davidson has some parts made in china too,and who woulda thunk?

I hope you don't own a cell phone. :D

Just because somethings made in China doesn't automatically make it shit. Quality control is the key and you have to trust that GM is checking these parts before they go on the cars. It's been shown over and over that most aftermarket wheels are made in places like China. Also, few of us could afford a car that was made/manufactured exclusively in the US. This is why I laugh everytime I read someones post about not buying something because it isn't american made.

BigMatt 09-20-2010 09:51 AM

wow 261 lbs of wheels and tires!!

Orange Krate 09-20-2010 01:25 PM

This is a great overview. Suspension and angle of trajectory are often the most overlooked and/or ill changed aspects of an automobile by DIY'ers. We see it daily with lifted and lowered cars. Keeping the symmetry and balance of the suspension is just as important as a good brake system and a tight steering box. It is amazing what a little tweak in tire height or elevation change will do to the handling characteristics, including braking and traction. Thanks for this link and to the writer/photographer for some good down and dirty basics.

Orange Krate 09-20-2010 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by axis (Post 2348788)
I hope you don't own a cell phone. :D

Just because somethings made in China doesn't automatically make it shit. Quality control is the key and you have to trust that GM is checking these parts before they go on the cars. It's been shown over and over that most aftermarket wheels are made in places like China. Also, few of us could afford a car that was made/manufactured exclusively in the US. This is why I laugh everytime I read someones post about not buying something because it isn't american made.

I agree with your statement about QA/QI in the parts department. However, their are MANY factors that go into making something in China (or any other country) too. Just because it is made cheaper doesn't mean it is better. A friend of mine is a forensics inspector for a major manufacturer here in the U.S. His company moved much of their production to China and now they are paying the price. The failures are KILLING their multi-million dollar business (pneumatic/hydraulic applications equipment) of which they have lion's share globally. The single underlying reason...CONTROL. They cannot control production (quantity and quality) as easily as they could in the U.S. There is something to be said about Made in the U.S.A. back in the day when things were built to last and not be disposable. :bow:

oachalon 09-20-2010 02:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Orange Krate (Post 2349537)
I agree with your statement about QA/QI in the parts department. However, their are MANY factors that go into making something in China (or any other country) too. Just because it is made cheaper doesn't mean it is better. A friend of mine is a forensics inspector for a major manufacturer here in the U.S. His company moved much of their production to China and now they are paying the price. The failures are KILLING their multi-million dollar business (pneumatic/hydraulic applications equipment) of which they have lion's share globally. The single underlying reason...CONTROL. They cannot control production (quantity and quality) as easily as they could in the U.S. There is something to be said about Made in the U.S.A. back in the day when things were built to last and not be disposable. :bow:

Orange Krate...i know exactly what you mean. i work for a company that has almost all of its factories in china or taiwan. I am engineer and part of the quality control for my company. It is very difficult to keep quality up when your parts are made in china. 90% of the problems are caused by cheap chinese material. The other 10% is because the chinese just dont care about quality control and testing of parts. You have to watch them 24 hours a day. We are not a big company and nothing close to the size of gm, but we do work with large chinese corporations. From what i have seen they are all the same.

buzzy56 09-20-2010 02:50 PM

excellent work
 
Thanks for the very through write up.The pics are excellent and I really enjoyed the article.Nicely put together.Informative articles such as this are just another reason why this site is the best I am TOTALLY
ADDICTED to camaro5!
:thumbup:

JusticePete 09-20-2010 03:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buzzy56 (Post 2349855)
Thanks for the very through write up.The pics are excellent and I really enjoyed the article.Nicely put together.Informative articles such as this are just another reason why this site is the best I am TOTALLY
ADDICTED to camaro5!

:thumbup:

:w00t:

REAPER SS 09-20-2010 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigMatt (Post 2348883)
wow 261 lbs of wheels and tires!!

Yeah, thats what I said. Thats alot of rotating mass.


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