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-   Cosmetic Maintenance: Washing, Waxing, Detailing, Bodywork, Protection (http://www.camaro5.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=45)
-   -   I would like to share a tip. (http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=301824)

chicagobulls 06-14-2013 02:16 AM

I would like to share a tip.
 
Just learned that instead of using precious detail spray or waterless wash you can use soap and water as lubricant for your clay. ...........:facepalm:

Why has no one told me this?

lscamaro 06-14-2013 02:35 AM

Yea lol you can

Glen e 06-14-2013 04:41 AM

When I want to strip everything, I dawn wash the car. With suds on the car is when I clay too. Anything that makes the clay glide works. Rinse, and go right to polishing with the car wet too.....

WiSSDiver 06-14-2013 07:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glen e (Post 6668767)
When I want to strip everything, I dawn wash the car. With suds on the car is when I clay too. Anything that makes the clay glide works. Rinse, and go right to polishing with the car wet too.....

Agreed. I do the same thing, but will wash one more time then dry before polishing.

nUcLeArEnVoY 06-14-2013 07:34 AM

You must've had very little claying left to do, because soap/water will break down the clay after a little while.

CamaroDreams07 06-14-2013 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nUcLeArEnVoY (Post 6669008)
You must've had very little claying left to do, because soap/water will break down the clay after a little while.

+1. Soap and water can work in a pinch but shouldn't be your first choice IMO

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

Glen e 06-14-2013 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nUcLeArEnVoY (Post 6669008)
You must've had very little claying left to do, because soap/water will break down the clay after a little while.

I use a nanosponge or prep towel - another reason to move to that...

but for years I used griots clay, (properly rinsed afterwards), with Dawn and never saw any breakdown....

Monchy36 06-14-2013 07:54 AM

So I read before that soap water was not good for claying, now it is? Confuse here??? :noidea:

CamaroDreams07 06-14-2013 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Monchy36 (Post 6669053)
So I read before that soap water was not good for claying, now it is? Confuse here??? :noidea:

Its still not. It WILL work, but its not the best idea IMO

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

Glen e 06-14-2013 08:33 AM

Interesting discussion:

http://www.autopiaforums.com/forums/...clay-lube.html

family man 06-14-2013 08:33 AM

"Precious" detail spray?:noidea:

nUcLeArEnVoY 06-14-2013 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glen e (Post 6669029)
I use a nanosponge or prep towel - another reason to move to that...

but for years I used griots clay, (properly rinsed afterwards), with Dawn and never saw any breakdown....

I tried those rubbery surfaced clay alternatives (the towel, the sponge, the autoscrub) and TBH, I dunno if I was doing something wrong, but they all left marring on any creases in the body work for me. Not on flat surfaces - just on creases. And when I mean marring, I don't mean scratches or swirls, I mean it began to fade the paint in those areas a bit as though I was rubbing an extremely fine sandpaper on them. You could see the pits of the orange peel. I had to follow them up w/ a polish.

The only thing I've noticed that really gives my paint the advertised "glass" feel with little to no scratches is a traditional blue claybar. Sure, it takes forever but it's just what I like to do. *Shrug.* You can get a better feel of the contamination with a traditional claybar too.

Odds are, you're going to mar your paint or scratch somewhere when using any mechanical decon method whether it's the sponge/towel or a claybar, because sometimes you really do gotta bear down hard with whatever you're using to get stubbon contamination out, which substantially raises your risk of scratching. But to think that with the sponge and towel; that the grit pretty much has nowhere to go but stay directly under the rubbery surface, is downright nauseating. At least with clay, there's a chance the grit will eventually sink into the clay where it can't scratch the paint.

Glen e 06-14-2013 08:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nUcLeArEnVoY (Post 6669197)
I tried those rubbery surfaced clay alternatives (the towel, the sponge, the autoscrub) and TBH, I dunno if I was doing something wrong, but they all left marring on any creases in the body work for me. Not on flat surfaces - just on creases. And when I mean marring, I don't mean scratches or swirls, I mean it began to fade the paint in those areas a bit as though I was rubbing an extremely fine sandpaper on them. You could see the pits of the orange peel. I had to follow them up w/ a polish.

The only thing I've noticed that really gives my paint the advertised "glass" feel with little to no scratches is a traditional blue claybar. Sure, it takes forever but it's just what I like to do. *Shrug.* You can get a better feel of the contamination with a traditional claybar too.

Odds are, you're going to mar your paint or scratch somewhere when using any mechanical decon method whether it's the sponge/towel or a claybar, because sometimes you really do gotta bear down hard with whatever you're using to get stubbon contamination out, which substantially raises your risk of scratching. But to think that with the sponge and towel; that the grit pretty much has nowhere to go but stay directly under the rubbery surface, is downright nauseating. At least with clay, there's a chance the grit will eventually sink into the clay where it can't scratch the paint.

I always seem to be in the minority here...LOL - Oh well, my lot in life.

We certainly have two diff levels here: hobbyists and prof detailers. As a prof detailer many times I would make a decision that is not the same as a DD hobbyist.

Now as a hobbyist, I have never seen any of the above creasing or marring with either the sponge or the speedy prep towl. Just a good clean base from which to start detailing. I don't use soap as I have plenty of waterless, but for someone that is cleaning/detailing his DD and claying like twice a year, I'm sure the saop is fine. I'll never use clay again after discovering the elastomeric products, particularly the speedy towel...

nUcLeArEnVoY 06-14-2013 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glen e (Post 6669268)
I always seem to be in the minority here...LOL - Oh well, my lot in life.

We certainly have two diff levels here: hobbyists and prof detailers. As a prof detailer many times I would make a decision that is not the same as a DD hobbyist.

Now as a hobbyist, I have never seen any of the above creasing or marring with either the sponge or the speedy prep towl. Just a good clean base from which to start detailing. I don't use soap as I have plenty of waterless, but for someone that is cleaning/detailing his DD and claying like twice a year, I'm sure the saop is fine. I'll never use clay again after discovering the elastomeric products, particularly the speedy towel...

To each his own. I'm glad those products work for you! :thumbup: But for me, they mar creases in my paint, and I've used multiple types to confirm that result, and for me, soap/water started to break my clay apart around an hour after continuous use. It could be my technique... and who knows, could be my paint. We dabble in a hobby where variation and inconsistency is the nature of the game.

I've always said I'm old-fashioned for my age, even when it comes to detailing products, it seems. :noidea:


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