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-   -   LOOKING AT STRUT TOWER BRACES, WHICH ONE? AND DO I NEED ONE? (http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=320633)

tillroot1 09-29-2013 08:54 PM

LOOKING AT STRUT TOWER BRACES, WHICH ONE? AND DO I NEED ONE?
 
I am thinking of putting a strut tower brace on my 2010 SS, I do not race it, but have heard it improves the handeling of the car, can you guys that have installed or had one installed please chime in? Thanks, Ron Tilley

JusticePete 09-29-2013 09:35 PM

Ron,

You absolutely positively do not need a strut tower bar.

Is your 5th Gen structurally sound? Take a close look at these crash test videos.





Watch the engine move while the front sub-frame remains almost stationary at 14 Seconds

The front sub-frame mounts with six bolts and two locating pins. There are no rubber bushes. The front sub-frame connects well forward and well behind the front ‘axle’ for strength and stability. As you could see in the frontal impact video the engine was moving backwards from the impact (at roughly 14 seconds), but the front sub-frame remained well located. When GM designed the Camaro they built it well, very well. It was engineered to have an exceptionally strong monocoque. A solid monocoque translates into a higher perception of quality while enhancing performance and function. In the following series of pictures you can see how the 5th Gen Camaro has numerous 'chassis braces' built in at the factory using state-of the art design in the form of shape, construction and materials --

High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel is a type of alloy steel that provides better mechanical properties or greater resistance to corrosion than carbon steel. HSLA steels vary from other steels in that they aren't made to meet a specific chemical composition, but rather to specific mechanical properties. They have a carbon content between 0.05–0.25% to retain formability and weldability. Other alloying elements include up to 2.0% manganese and small quantities of copper, nickel, niobium, nitrogen, vanadium, chromium, molybdenum, titanium, calcium, rare earth elements, or zirconium.[1][2] Copper, titanium, vanadium, and niobium are added for strengthening purposes.[2] These elements are intended to alter the microstructure of carbon steels, which is usually a ferrite-pearlite aggregate, to produce a very fine dispersion of alloy carbides in an almost pure ferrite matrix. This eliminates the toughness-reducing effect of a pearlitic volume fraction, yet maintains and increases the material's strength by refining the grain size, which in the case of ferrite increases yield strength by 50% for every halving of the mean grain diameter. Precipitation strengthening plays a minor role, too. Their yield strengths can be anywhere between 250–590 megapascals (36,000–86,000 psi). Due to their higher strength and toughness HSLA steels usually require 25 to 30% more power to form, as compared to carbon steels

Martensitic Ultra High Strength Steel Maraging steels (a portmanteau of martensitic and aging) are iron alloys which are known for possessing superior strength and toughness without losing malleability, although they cannot hold a good cutting edge. 'Aging' refers to the extended heat-treatment process. These steels are a special class of low-carbon ultra-high-strength steels which derive their strength not from carbon, but from precipitation of inter-metallic compounds. The principal alloying element is 15 to 25% nickel.[1] Secondary alloying elements are added to produce intermetallic precipitates, which include cobalt, molybdenum, and titanium.

Photos originally posted 11.11.2008 by aston70

http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...5&d=1226429409
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...6&d=1226429409
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...7&d=1226429409
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...8&d=1226429409
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...9&d=1226429409
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...0&d=1226429475
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...2&d=1226429475
http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...3&d=1226429475

Do you need a strut tower bar? Many assume they do. The brace was and is necessary when the roof is cut off. That is why TEAM Camaro designed and install the brace installing the Vert. The brace installed on the ZL1 indirectly for NVH. The STB cleaned up some 'noise' on the sensors used to fine tune the MRC. The STB looks cool so it is part of the 1LE package.

It would deny the obvious to say the OE STB does nothing. It does add structure to an already robust monocoque. There is zero data available that documents any gain in handling or lap times. None.

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...19059043_n.jpg

When you are considering the modifications you choose to make to your Camaro, we strongly suggest you take a holistic approach and discuss the entire range of modifications with your Pedders Suspension Specialist. They can guide you through the selection process to make certain that each modification compliments all the others to create the best possible custom Camaro for your personal use at the most reasonable cost. Do it right. Do it once.

SPCBA 09-29-2013 10:08 PM

Strut bar for car shows yes. Strut bar for better handling? Have yet to see any proof. I do not know why gm decided to put them on camaros aside from the vert

LimaCharlie 09-30-2013 01:10 AM

You will also have to drill holes on the strut towers to install a brace on your 2010 SS. The first Camaro to have a factory brace was the 2011 convertible (January 2011). All Camaros built after January 2011 (regardless if it has a factory brace or not) have pre drilled holes in strut towers.

JDP Tyler 09-30-2013 12:58 PM

They are more for looks than anything else. If you like the look enough, go for it, but if you are doing it for a handling upgrade, then spend your money elsewhere.

Feel free to call, PM or email me anytime with questions.

Best regards,

Tyler
888-308-6007


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