Camaro5 Chevy Camaro Forum / Camaro ZL1, SS and V6 Forums - Camaro5.com
 
Anthony @ LG Motorsports
Go Back   Camaro5 Chevy Camaro Forum / Camaro ZL1, SS and V6 Forums - Camaro5.com > Technical Camaro Topics > Garage / Tools Discussions


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-23-2014, 09:11 PM   #18
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Supercharged SS
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,704
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Batmanntexas View Post
I was given a Husky 2-stage 220V compressor about 2 years ago, which presented me with a similar problem. I didn't want to run a 220V circuit through the finished walls in the garage. My solution was to install a double pole breaker into one of the unused slots in the breaker box, and locate a 220 outlet right below the box. I bought some remnant cable from Lowe's, wired one end to the compressor, and put a 220V plug on the other end. I think I spent about $50 parts and cable all combined.
I may go this route. However when I replaced my entire power mast and electric box on the house the week after Katrina I made sure to leave myself an easy upgrade plan. I could have this run and done in an hour if I choose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by motorhead View Post
Not sure if it's been mentioned above, but your better two stage compressors allow for higher air pressure. This allows for running better air tools at higher pressures to give you the power to break tight bolts. Most cheaper two stage compressors still only go to just above 100psi. Also when talking real Hp instead of "advertised" a two Hp motor is the biggest you will run on a 20 amp 110v circuit without tripping breakers. This is why 110 units are just toys for any kind of real garage work. If you want to run a nailer or do small projects they are fine.

My suggest would be to get a good professional two stage in the 5hp range. If you can afford to buy high end wheels and superchargers you should be able to afford a good compressor. Lol
The cost is really not much more at all. I have a hundred foot of romex already so I should be fine. My good compressor died recently so I've been using this small one. When I say my good compressor it was not even 5cfm so kinda sucked anyway.

The plan is to move in the next couple of years from this house but I will still run the wires if needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHMSC View Post
You are right PQ. Another member said already quality air tools makes a huge difference. I have no problem with my 30 gallon compressor and good air tools.
I do plan on some painting as well. I hear that uses the air pretty good too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Twisty View Post
As far as couplers, (quick connects) Milton brass 1/4" is what dad always used, and they were pretty durable. 1/4" couplers with 3/8 hose and 1/4" fitting ends should give all the volume you need.

Not all couplers are exactly the same, make sure you get matching males & females. Most smaller air tools are 1/4 npt, including your air ratchet, unless you have a superduper high torque model.

Also, don't skimp on your air line, I bought some Chinese craponacracker hose that cracked & leaked in less than a year. ....
I always did buy good fittings. And plenty of them. I have a bucket full.
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 09:21 PM   #19
motorhead


 
motorhead's Avatar
 
Drives: Stormtrooper
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Bartertown
Posts: 8,996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Twisty View Post

Also, don't skimp on your air line, I bought some Chinese craponacracker hose that cracked & leaked
Agree here. I always buy Goodyear air line. I still have the first one I ever bought over 25 years ago.
motorhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 09:22 PM   #20
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Supercharged SS
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,704
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorhead View Post
Agree here. I always buy Goodyear air line. I still have the first one I ever bought over 25 years ago.
You mean I shouldn't tape a bunch of straws together and use that?
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 09:30 PM   #21
motorhead


 
motorhead's Avatar
 
Drives: Stormtrooper
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Bartertown
Posts: 8,996
Quote:
Originally Posted by PQ View Post
You mean I shouldn't tape a bunch of straws together and use that?
Haha! Just get a good garden hose.
motorhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 11:06 PM   #22
Mr Twisty


 
Mr Twisty's Avatar
 
Drives: the 2nd amendment home
Join Date: May 2008
Location: OK
Posts: 13,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by PQ View Post
You mean I shouldn't tape a bunch of straws together and use that?
You could just BLOWHARD.....

Wouldn't even need a compressor

Try this, let me know how it works

http://www.rockler.com/flexzillareg-...ngths-air-hose

You guys were talking about connectors and what-not doohicky things in the other thread, didn't know if it was covered or not.
__________________
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
-- Benjamin Franklin
Mr Twisty is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 11:20 PM   #23
gotroost

 
gotroost's Avatar
 
Drives: IOM 2SS RS
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
Posts: 872
Just my 2 cents.

Air compressor - big volume and quick recovery. You may decide you may want to paint or air sand an entire vehicle some day. I was lucky and inherited mine from my Dad's diesel shop. Must be 40 years old, but still strong with regular maintenance.

Noise - If you end up running power, I would recommend building a noise insulated dog house in or out of your shop. Much more pleasant for the operator.

Dry air - Get an air dryer for the life of your tools. Mo is better for any type of painting or tool life. I live in AZ, but the air tank still builds up water.

Hoses - NAPA paint hose work for me for general use. Kink proof and durable. But I make sure I keep the true paint hoses oil/contaminant free.

Tools - I've had my Chicago Pneumatic 3/4 air wrench for 20 plus years. Rated for more torque than most and still running strong. My Dad's one got away from me over the years, but its still in operation after 35 years. Just keep them oiled and dry.
__________________

Mods: JRE 470 cam kit, Dynatech long tubes/hi-flo cats, SLP underdrive pulley, CAI intake/ADM scoop, Pfadt Stage 2 suspension, Hotchkiss strut tower brace, Proven Wicked tow hook and end links, DBA rotors, some bloody knuckles, still in progress...
gotroost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 11:31 PM   #24
gotroost

 
gotroost's Avatar
 
Drives: IOM 2SS RS
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
Posts: 872
Just for fun - check out an air nibbler and a "zip gun" (aka air hammer). Zip gun makes short work of stodgy bolts and concrete if needed. Zip gun has saved from firing up the torch on several occasions. Nibbler makes short work of shaping aluminum.

Your post just reminded me that I need to get my toys out and lube them up.
__________________

Mods: JRE 470 cam kit, Dynatech long tubes/hi-flo cats, SLP underdrive pulley, CAI intake/ADM scoop, Pfadt Stage 2 suspension, Hotchkiss strut tower brace, Proven Wicked tow hook and end links, DBA rotors, some bloody knuckles, still in progress...
gotroost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 12:15 AM   #25
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Supercharged SS
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,704
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Twisty View Post
You could just BLOWHARD.....

Wouldn't even need a compressor

Try this, let me know how it works

http://www.rockler.com/flexzillareg-...ngths-air-hose

You guys were talking about connectors and what-not doohicky things in the other thread, didn't know if it was covered or not.
OOOooooooooOOOOoooooo..... those couplers are pretty on that page.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gotroost View Post
Just my 2 cents.

Air compressor - big volume and quick recovery. You may decide you may want to paint or air sand an entire vehicle some day. I was lucky and inherited mine from my Dad's diesel shop. Must be 40 years old, but still strong with regular maintenance.

Noise - If you end up running power, I would recommend building a noise insulated dog house in or out of your shop. Much more pleasant for the operator.

Dry air - Get an air dryer for the life of your tools. Mo is better for any type of painting or tool life. I live in AZ, but the air tank still builds up water.

Hoses - NAPA paint hose work for me for general use. Kink proof and durable. But I make sure I keep the true paint hoses oil/contaminant free.

Tools - I've had my Chicago Pneumatic 3/4 air wrench for 20 plus years. Rated for more torque than most and still running strong. My Dad's one got away from me over the years, but its still in operation after 35 years. Just keep them oiled and dry.
All good info. It is humid as hell here so I may just do that. I have to drain water every time I use my compressor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gotroost View Post
Just for fun - check out an air nibbler and a "zip gun" (aka air hammer). Zip gun makes short work of stodgy bolts and concrete if needed. Zip gun has saved from firing up the torch on several occasions. Nibbler makes short work of shaping aluminum.

Your post just reminded me that I need to get my toys out and lube them up.
Glad I can help.

Ya, I will be buying a paint gun soon. I have a few projects I'll be working on and I was told that the last thing you want is for the tool to get low and sputter.
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 01:07 PM   #26
CHMSC
ROAD COURSE JUNKIE
 
CHMSC's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 SS/RS LS3
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 4,844
Then you should really go with a 60 or 80 for painting, unless you are doing very small pieces. Make sure to get some good filters so there is no moisture in your pain.
__________________
CHMSC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 07:37 PM   #27
Mr Twisty


 
Mr Twisty's Avatar
 
Drives: the 2nd amendment home
Join Date: May 2008
Location: OK
Posts: 13,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by PQ View Post

the last thing you want is for the tool to get low and sputter.
That's what she said
__________________
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
-- Benjamin Franklin
Mr Twisty is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 10:18 PM   #28
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Supercharged SS
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,704
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Twisty View Post
That's what she said
lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHMSC View Post
Then you should really go with a 60 or 80 for painting, unless you are doing very small pieces. Make sure to get some good filters so there is no moisture in your pain.
Good tip. I will.
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2014, 07:35 PM   #29
Bo White



 
Bo White's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Summit White 1SS
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Vance Alabama
Posts: 4,419
I bought the 60 gallon Kobalt from Lowes like 5 years ago, port cylinder heads with it all the time without issue.
__________________
OK, OK.....Ive been sweet talked into 1 more year.
Bo White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2014, 07:41 PM   #30
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Supercharged SS
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,704
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo White View Post
I bought the 60 gallon Kobalt from Lowes like 5 years ago, port cylinder heads with it all the time without issue.
Can you remember what you paid for it?
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2014, 09:43 PM   #31
badss98
 
Drives: 07 hummer h2,07 silverado 4x4
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: adrian michigan
Posts: 1
Remember cfm is the main number you should be concerned about, Tank size does not relate to cfm. A 60 gallon tank can put out low cfm as this is about storage or compressor cycle time. A two stage compressor will usually out perform a single stage in the cfm delivery. Also 2 stage compressors will usually be oil bath and run quieter not like the direct drive which can be very loud. If you want to have something that will meet all your needs a 2 stage 60 gallon should be more than enough for the home garage. If you need a great air ratchet at a reasonable price go purchase a 1/2 inch earthquake at harbour freight this ratchet is a real workhorse that will never let you down not to mention the price is affordable. Good luck on your search
badss98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2014, 11:41 PM   #32
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Supercharged SS
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,704
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by badss98 View Post
Remember cfm is the main number you should be concerned about, Tank size does not relate to cfm. A 60 gallon tank can put out low cfm as this is about storage or compressor cycle time. A two stage compressor will usually out perform a single stage in the cfm delivery. Also 2 stage compressors will usually be oil bath and run quieter not like the direct drive which can be very loud. If you want to have something that will meet all your needs a 2 stage 60 gallon should be more than enough for the home garage. If you need a great air ratchet at a reasonable price go purchase a 1/2 inch earthquake at harbour freight this ratchet is a real workhorse that will never let you down not to mention the price is affordable. Good luck on your search
Thanks for the info.

I still have not pulled the trigger. Just don't know what to order. So many it's almost eeeny meeny meiny mo......
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2014, 02:00 PM   #33
Mr Twisty


 
Mr Twisty's Avatar
 
Drives: the 2nd amendment home
Join Date: May 2008
Location: OK
Posts: 13,860
Watch your local craigslist for a good used compressor. Mine is from the 70's and still going strong, although I did have to change the motor from a 3-phase to 1-phase it was still a great deal at $300. (plus $150 for motor)

If you find a Worthington or old Eaton for cheap snatch it up. Can still get parts for both even after all these years.

I bought a dinky hose on a whim from the local welding store, it's a 'Flexeel' hose, so far I LIKE it! We'll see how durability is, but it's so small OD I can leave it in the utility room coiled up so it'll probably last a good many years as little as I use it.
__________________
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
-- Benjamin Franklin
Mr Twisty is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 01:56 PM   #34
fshog
 
fshog's Avatar
 
Drives: 2011 RS/2SS
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Okotoks, Alberta
Posts: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by badss98 View Post
Remember cfm is the main number you should be concerned about, Tank size does not relate to cfm. A 60 gallon tank can put out low cfm as this is about storage or compressor cycle time. A two stage compressor will usually out perform a single stage in the cfm delivery. Also 2 stage compressors will usually be oil bath and run quieter not like the direct drive which can be very loud. If you want to have something that will meet all your needs a 2 stage 60 gallon should be more than enough for the home garage. If you need a great air ratchet at a reasonable price go purchase a 1/2 inch earthquake at harbour freight this ratchet is a real workhorse that will never let you down not to mention the price is affordable. Good luck on your search

This statement on CFM is the most important......larger tank if you are thinking of painting will definitely be an asset. A water trap & lubricator combo unit are nice alternative to an air dryer, but the lubricator will need to be bypassed if you paint. Most low end air dryers aren't worth the money spent as they still allow moist air to enter the system. Basically good preventative maintenance is the cheapest and easiest way to manage the moisture.....drain the tank on a consistent basis. All in all, one can spend $500 and have a really good compressor that needs to be managed a bit.....or you can spend $5000 and have a great system that will take care of itself......I personally opt for the $500 and manage it myself!!
fshog is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.