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Old 11-27-2012, 10:24 PM   #141
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Originally Posted by Good_Times View Post
I was trying to explain that the amount of pressure required to polish or make paint corrections varies from one application to another. It's not a one size fits all. Seems simple to me. On some applications a lot of pressure may be required and some require a light touch. Sorry I don't make videos . I just polish cars and make a little money and try and share what I believe is useful information.I don't have a following but was showing an example of someone who reps a major company that agrees sometimes more downward pressure is required.


I have edited my last reply to explain my intent. I'm not a english teacher or educated illustrator but just a 10th grade drop out that has raised a family and put two kids through college and make littles a money detailing cars and enjoying retirement at a early age. Peace out.
Your post read like plain English to me. Made perfect sense, and was actually very useful. One size does not fit all in machine polishing, ESPECIALLY now that we have the introduction of microfiber systems. Vast differences exist in technique across systems.

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Old 11-27-2012, 10:38 PM   #142
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Originally Posted by CamaroDreams07 View Post
Your post read like plain English to me. Made perfect sense, and was actually very useful. One size does not fit all in machine polishing, ESPECIALLY now that we have the introduction of microfiber systems. Vast differences exist in technique across systems.

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Is it fair to say that the microfiber pads correct better/faster than foam pads but don't finish as well?
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:50 PM   #143
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Is it fair to say that the microfiber pads correct better/faster than foam pads but don't finish as well?
That's fair, but they can leave a very nice finish as well, with enough practice.

Definitely more corrective power and faster than foam, though.

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Old 11-27-2012, 11:31 PM   #144
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I can add you to the list of folks who have learned that technique trumps product every time.
In your videos you say 9-14 pounds of pressure and to practice on a scale.
In the PC manual it say the unit applies enough pressure itself. And the PC is fairly hefty.

What happens on 105 vs. 205 if you just use the weight of the PC?
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Old 11-27-2012, 11:51 PM   #145
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Remember the original PC was designed for wood working (sanding).Use those numbers as a base to start and see how it works.As I have mentioned to others do a little trial with more or less pressure. Using m105,m205 or a variety of other compounds a test spot is needed to dial in your process. You can have all the products and equipment available but until you determine which pad , compound , arm speed and pressure is going to give you your desired results on a test spot then there is no need to do the whole car yet. Its not as complicated as it sounds.
You asked about 105 and 205 with just the da weight. The correction would be very slow until you applied some pressure. How much would depend on condition of the paint , pad selection etc. M105 has a somewhat shorter working time before it dries out compared to a few other choices. It's good stuff but there are many choices. I personally mix M105 and m101 (which is now offered in the USA) or m105 and D300 to extend it's working time and reduce dusting.
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Old 11-27-2012, 11:57 PM   #146
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Originally Posted by CamaroDreams07 View Post
Your post read like plain English to me. Made perfect sense, and was actually very useful. One size does not fit all in machine polishing, ESPECIALLY now that we have the introduction of microfiber systems. Vast differences exist in technique across systems.
Then allow me to words it in a way that makes sense to me, because there are key words that I use when I preach this stuff, and are on point with what I've been saying in this thread AND in my videos.

There is more than ONE technique when it comes to machine polishing. Speed of movement of the polisher, applied pressure on the polisher and the OPM/RPM setting of the polisher can vary from technique to technique, depending on the polisher, pads, and the compounds/polishes used.

There... that makes perfect sense to me. As a matter of fact, I explain that in my videos. I go as far as to say there are plenty of techniques that you can use but I am only going to show you ONE. Anyone who has watched those videos enough times has definitely heard this.

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Originally Posted by CrystalRedTintcoat View Post
In your videos you say 9-14 pounds of pressure and to practice on a scale.
In the PC manual it say the unit applies enough pressure itself. And the PC is fairly hefty.

What happens on 105 vs. 205 if you just use the weight of the PC?
If you have watched me work the PC in enough videos, you have seen me use it with one hand. How much pressure do you think I am applying with one hand? The machine itself weights almost 6 pounds. I am basically applying just enough pressure to keep the pad flat, but not enough to stop the rotation of the back plate.
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Old 11-27-2012, 11:57 PM   #147
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Thanks, GT. Interestingly, my PC instructions had the weight comment in the polishing section for auto care. The instructions said it can be used for cars or sanding.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:33 AM   #148
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While I intend to utilize junkmans technique, (thanks for all the info junkman!) does anyone have a good source to learn about other techniques or to find out more about the different systems like microfiber pads, etc? I'd love to even buy an old hood from a junkyard and experiment with them sometime.

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Old 11-28-2012, 06:43 AM   #149
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Auto geek. Autopia adams and detailer domain all have videos with technique and advice and products and even tell you about the different pads. And I spoke to my paint shop at dealer and they too said the pleasure is key and that you can indeed put swirl marks in your paint using a compound. So they forewarned me. Just like the junkman will admit. How many years you been dong it. It's like me asking my 15 year old why she doesn't drive as well as me a professional driver of many years. Experience is key to this. Especially if technique is 75%.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:14 AM   #150
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Experience is key ONLY if you are doing it right. Like the saying goes, perfect practice makes perfect. I've seen guys doing stuff for years the wrong way who thought that they were experts at something.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:18 AM   #151
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Originally Posted by BlueRay-J View Post
While I intend to utilize junkmans technique, (thanks for all the info junkman!) does anyone have a good source to learn about other techniques or to find out more about the different systems like microfiber pads, etc? I'd love to even buy an old hood from a junkyard and experiment with them sometime.

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You're definitely on the right track to seek out different sources. I'll throw my two cents in as well.

If you use the web sites suggested including Junkman's, you'll find some common steps that you'll need develop and perfect a technique for each step that will like end up being your own with influences from these sources. Personally I think Junkman's is one of the best. It's kind of like having a buddy in the garage helping you along

These steps look like this (IMO)
Wash - Most will recommend the 2 bucket system and is the key to your on going maintenance technique once you've corrected your paint. There are also some excellent No Rinse products that can help you maintain you car in between washes for a car that isn't super dirty. Check our ONR on Autogeek.net

Dry - You'll find everything from the leaf blower to the MF towels. I definately believe in Junkman's theory of "you can't scratch the car if you don't touch i,"

Clay / Decontaminate - Claying was pretty much the standard for details but there have been some new products introduced that make the chore easier and quicker

Polish - Process used to remove the scratches and imperfections visible to the eye (Scratches, swirls, holograms from a bad technique) Depend on the products used, this could be a 2-3 step process and is very time consuming, however it's the foundation of bring the shine out.

Sealant - Now that you've corrected your paint, use of sealants is the foundation of protecting the surface from further marring of your surface

Glaze (Optional step) Will offer a temporary filler of any scratches and will help to mask very minor imperfections

Wax - Final step of protection. The wax doesn't create the shine, only protects. It will give the illusion of shine if the wax has fillers but is only temporary

Now, each step will require you develop your own technique and all of the suggestions (Especially Junkman's) will point you in the right direction but ultimately it's up to you to practice and perfect your technique.

One last comment, A lot of guys get all hung up on each and every last little step in the process and think that in order to maintain this shine, you've got to perform every technique on the car each time your clean your car. That is not the case and once you correct your paint for the first time, many of the on-going steps you'll need to perform will be much easier and quicker once you've done the first full correction. For example, contrary to Junkman's advice, there are times when instead of the 2 bucket wash, I'll use the ONR product, but certain conditions must exist or I'll just leave the car dirty until I can do it right. Point being I can ONR my car in about a 1/2 hour and I'm ready to drive away and the car looks great. My standard wash, dry and LSP touch up is about 1 1/2 hours.

Finally, a number of us here detail because it's like therapy and while we try to do it the right way, probably get more out of it for our soul and in the spirit of sharing what we've discovered than for the final out come. Although the final out come is pretty damn impressive.

Thanks again AJ for all of your encouragement and help keeping my toys shinny
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:27 AM   #152
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... Thanks again AJ for all of your encouragement and help keeping my toys shinny
You really should leave the keys in that 68' so that I can steal it.

Now one thing that I don't want to do in this thread is confuse any novices who are reading it with five hundred ways of doing something. That's the problem now with them trying to learn this stuff. There are 500 ways to Tuesday to do the same exact thing, and everyone claims one way is better than the other. I want to offer a novice one way that works. If they choose to go off and look at other ways of doing stuff, that's on them. But in my thread, I want to concentrate on what they have seen in my videos. That way, reading the various post in this thread does not create confusion within their learning process.
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Old 11-28-2012, 09:30 AM   #153
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Experience is key ONLY if you are doing it right. Like the saying goes, perfect practice makes perfect. I've seen guys doing stuff for years the wrong way who thought that they were experts at something.
Don't forget the five P's.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:23 PM   #154
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You really should leave the keys in that 68' so that I can steal it.

Now one thing that I don't want to do in this thread is confuse any novices who are reading it with five hundred ways of doing something. That's the problem now with them trying to learn this stuff. There are 500 ways to Tuesday to do the same exact thing, and everyone claims one way is better than the other. I want to offer a novice one way that works. If they choose to go off and look at other ways of doing stuff, that's on them. But in my thread, I want to concentrate on what they have seen in my videos. That way, reading the various post in this thread does not create confusion within their learning process.

AJ you can drive my 68 any time you want. Just have to come up to Milwaukee to do it (in the spring and summer of course.)

Agreed on the 500 ways (to leave your lover) I should have mentioned if you're learning the Junkman technique, always refer back to the video.

I was answering the "different technique" question the poster had and wanted to try to share what I had discovered as common denominators in the 3 or 4 resources that were recommended to him.

So, disclaimer: when learning the Junkman technique, when in doubt watch the video again. If there still are questions, watch it again. All the answers are there and if you don't hear him say it, watch the video again because if he did leave something out while taping, he went back and put in via the pop video comments.

Did I mention to watch the video again?
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