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Old 05-30-2013, 09:33 PM   #1
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The Cars of "Fast & Furious 6"

In this thread I thought I would post all of the cars that were featured in the film.










(The "Hemi" billboard stripe didn't make it into the movie. But it was on one of the cars during pre-filming testing at Willow Springs. )

Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 2011 Wide-Body Dodge Challenger
Fast, Furious and Practically Brand-New
Quote:
It starts up like any other 2011 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392: with a noticeable popping thump as the big 6.4-liter V8 spins to life. Then the engine settles into a rumbling idle. Dennis McCarthy's crew hasn't really done anything mechanical to this Challenger and that's OK. Because this wide-body thing does burnouts that produce clouds of smoke so big that they interrupt air traffic in surrounding states.

And it's not just the quality of the smoke that makes these burnouts worthy of hymns and passion plays, but how easily this Mopar produces them. All it takes is turning off the traction control, firmly planting your right foot on the brake and letting your left big toe ease into the accelerator pedal and then... then... the rear tires ignite as if they'd been thrown into a steel mill's furnace.

If you're looking for a test of the 2011 Dodge Challenger SRT8 392, check out Edmunds.com's exhaustive array of instrumented testing in this comparison test. Or take a look at this exciting Burnout Supertest. And then revel in this straightforward full test. Then come back here and read about the movie car.

Return Engagement
At the end of 2011's Fast Five, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) and Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) have made it out of Brazil with $100 million and are relaxing in some unidentified tropical paradise. Somewhere in there O'Conner has acquired an R35 Nissan GT-R and Toretto has assumed ownership of this Challenger SRT8 392. And of course they decide to race them against one another just as the credits roll.

Apparently Fast & Furious 6 picks up at exactly that moment where Fast Five ended. So this is one of the few cars to appear in not one, but two Fast & Furious films. Surely if the Challenger had had parents, they'd be terribly proud of this distinction.

After that race is concluded, however, the Challenger virtually disappears from the film. Oh well, that's how fickle stardom is.

Not So Modified
Picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy needed four of these Challengers for filming and Dodge was happy to supply them for promotional value. And since they were new cars, there wasn't any reason to rebuild or reengineer them. One was crashed, one was cut up for green screen filming and two were returned to Chrysler and crushed.

However, it wouldn't do to have Dominic Toretto running around in a stock Dodge. So each Challenger was fitted with a wide-body kit from Classic Design Concepts. That includes new, wider composite plastic replacement front fenders and composite rear fender extensions. Altogether, the extensions add a massive 6 inches of width to the Challenger and allow the fitment of tires with up to 315 millimeters of tread width.

Taking advantage of the additional width is a set of USW forged modular wheels inside 275/40R20 front and 315/40R20 rear Continental tires. And those rear tires make great smoke.
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Old 05-30-2013, 09:36 PM   #2
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(It's not a V10, but it's good enough for movie work. BMW's 4.8-liter V8 was rated at 360 horsepower in 2010)






Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 2010 BMW M5
The Good Guys Wear Black BMW M5s
Quote:
Movie heroes are only as good as the bad guys they must confront. And in Fast & Furious 6, the first time the good guys go up against the bad guys they're armed with five E60-series BMW M5 sedans. That's the generation of M5 built between 2005 and 2010: the one with the high-revving, 500-horsepower, 5.0-liter V10 and ridiculously complex seven-speed automatic transmission. You know, the one that emitted a wail when it launched that sounded like an air raid siren echoing across a Bavarian beer hall. It's the baddest-ass four-door of the last decade.

And of course the BMWs portraying the M5s in Fast & Furious 6 aren't actually M5s at all. Come on, it's not like there are close-up shots of the engines or timeouts in the chase to show off the transmission. And, obviously, there were more than just five 5 Series sedans involved, too. In fact, Dennis McCarthy's picture car department acquired and modified 14 right-hand-drive E60s for use in the film. And none of them were actual BMW M5s.

Locally Sourced
Since the "Team vs. Team" chase would be filmed in Great Britain, there was no reason to search out BMWs in other parts of the world. Instead McCarthy's team simply went looking at dealers and auctions in the U.K. for appropriate vehicles and purchased them. After that it was simply a matter of adding the right M5-spec plastic bits, digging holes in the front fenders for M5 vents, and fitting each of the 14 cars with a set of black-painted 19-inch M5 wheels and tires and faking up a set of four exhaust outlets.

The cars were a mix of inline-6-equipped 530i and V8-powered 550i models. The nicer ones were reserved for on-camera work with the actors, while the tired examples were prepped for their spectacular on-screen demise. Such is the way of cinematic unnatural selection.

For the stunt team that would drive them, however, the 5 Series did have one serious problem. "Modern cars all have electronic parking brakes," explained stunt coordinator Greg Powell. "So we needed to change that." Most of the cars were equipped with a supplementary hand brake acting on the rear wheels so stunt drivers could induce oversteer at will. And, naturally, all the electronic nannies (traction control, ABS, variable steering and the like) were disabled.

Each of the movie cars was also fitted with an extensive roll cage and Sabelt Challenge racing seats. While it's common in films for the roll cages to be hidden, it wasn't necessary in this case because of how the M5s were being portrayed in the story. That also meant the five-point Sabelt racing harnesses could remain visible.

There was no need to modify the engines or transmissions (a mix of manuals and automatics) of these 5 Series BMWs. After all, they're dang nice used cars.

14 Go in, Three Survive
While there were 14 putative BMW M5s built for the Team vs. Team chase, only three survived. The other 11 gave their lives so that you, the movie-going gearhead, could be entertained when the movie opens on May 24.

Not surprisingly, the cars that survived were the hero vehicles driven by the actors. And because these cars can be shown in greater detail on camera than the stunt machines, they feature more M5 equipment such as door sill logos and M Motorsport steering wheels.

It's always the pretty ones that survive.
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Old 05-30-2013, 09:43 PM   #3
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 1970 Ford Escort RS1600
The Little Ford That Flies
Quote:
Think of it as a '69 Camaro for blokes. It's the Ford Escort RS1600: a simple little car shoved full of the best engine Ford and Cosworth could devise. It's England's half-pint muscle car, but it's not that muscular. And it has a flying, memorable turn in Fast & Furious 6 with Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) at the wheel. It's the sort of appearance that only adds to the car's legend. Even though no one on this side of the Atlantic knows that legend at all.

"The guys in England built the sh*t out of these," reports picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy about his British-based shop. "I couldn't get them to do much else, but they loved working on the Escorts."

Introduced in 1968, the Escort was Ford's European small car. Back before front-drive orthodoxy crushed the life out of all things, it was a rear-driver built around a few pieces of bent metal pretending to be a unibody chassis, a pair of MacPherson struts up front and a solid rear axle on leaf springs in back. Most of them came with microscopic four-cylinder, overhead-valve engines of 1.1- or 1.3-liter displacement. These were low-compression, low-horsepower engines and you could personally produce more torque than those engines did using only your tongue.

Ordinary? In its day the Escort was more common in England than crumpets or cricket. Pedestrians would walk into them because they were so easy to overlook. It made British Leyland's crap look like exotic delicacies.

But then there was the RS...

The Greatness of an Engine
As ridiculously primitive as the Ford Escort was, its small size made it nimble and its simplicity meant it was rugged. That was enough, in the days before the Group B insanity of the 1980s brought along turbochargers and all-wheel drive, to form the foundation for a good rally car. All the Escort needed was power.

In the 1970 Ford Escort RS1600 that power comes from the Cosworth-designed, 1.6-liter twincam 16-valve BDA four-cylinder engine. Released in 1969 and based on Ford's iron "Kent" block, the BDA featured Ford's first four-valve combustion chambers and transformed the sleepy 1970 Escort into a robust athlete prepped to take on rallying. Even with its dual side-draft Weber carbs, the BDA only made about 113 horsepower. But the Escort weighed less than 1,800 pounds, and that gave it a power-to-weight ratio similar to that of the era's nominally more powerful sports cars.

Almost immediately, the blister-fendered Escort RS1600 and its close relatives (including the Mexico and RS2000) began racking up victories across the rallying world. And almost immediately, it became a symbol of what Britain still did well: build great racing engines and tune the hell out of small cars.

Five for Furious Six
Fast & Furious may be an American production, but it's an international hit. The appeal of the 1970 Ford Escort RS1600, though it was never sold in North America, is to that worldwide audience that appreciates Charger Daytonas and Mustangs, but loves the stuff they grew up with as well.

So the production bought five of the right-hand-drive RS1600s in Great Britain and completely rebuilt them in a British shop. That meant tearing the Escorts down to the bare shells and building them back up again. The engines were rebuilt, new five-speed manual transmissions went in behind them, new roll cages were fitted and each car was equipped with a pair of racing seats. The standard instrumentation was ditched in favor of black panels with Revotec gauges. Forget an ignition key. It's been replaced by a battery connector plug and individual switches for the fuel pump and ignition.

Sitting on 13-by-7-inch Compomotive Minilite-like bladed wheels and painted up in classic blue and white, this is a great-looking little car. The 205/60R13 Federal Super Steel 595 tires fill out the wheelwells, and all the connectors, mud flaps and tie-down springs look perfectly 1970-spec. This is a badass little car.

Flight Tested
Turn everything on, hit the start button and this twerp growls to life. It sounds as if it's ready to run away and win the London to Mexico rally. And during a short drive around Dennis McCarthy's shop near the Burbank Airport, it drove great. It was raw and a little beastly, but great.

But this RS1600's role in Fast & Furious 6 included a massive jump across a highway divider in the Canary Islands. And no matter how well the Escort seems to handle the epic leap in the film, in reality that's murder to any car.

So the two Ford Escort RS1600s that performed the big jump were destroyed. The first, reports McCarthy, wound up on its roof. And the second landed on its wheels but its structure was pretzeled up nasty.

At least the pair will live on for this summer in the movie. And they'll live on in the Blu-Ray disc... and on iTunes... and Netflix... and in an infinite number of reruns on every cable channel forever.
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:00 PM   #4
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 1971 Jensen Interceptor
Letty's Latest Ride Brings Her Back From the Movie Netherworld
Quote:
If there's an unlikely star in Fast & Furious 6 it's the Jensen Interceptor. Built by tiny Jensen Motors in England between 1966 and 1976, the Interceptor is a big, rear-drive personal luxury machine in the vein of the Jaguar XJ-S or a Bristol. But instead of a temperamental, Euro-weenie six or high-strung V12 under its hood, the Interceptor was powered by pure American muscle: either 383 cubic inches (6.3 liters) or 440 cubic inches (7.2 liters) of old-school, carbureted, V8 American muscle. And that made it kind of super cool back when you could use phrases like "super cool" without irony.

The Interceptor's hipster vibe has carried into the 21st century intact. There's even a micro-industry that's developed around restoring and updating Interceptors. All that is because, even 47 years after it entered production, the Interceptor is still a great and contemporary-looking machine. The body was designed in Italy by Carrozzeria Touring with exceptionally clean surfaces and a long nose that balances the weight of the huge, wraparound rear window.

In Fast & Furious 6 the 1971 Jensen Interceptor is driven by a character who returns from a presumed death. OK, it's Letty, as played by Michelle Rodriguez, the once super-tight significant other of Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) who apparently died in a tumbling '70 Plymouth Road Runner about halfway through 2009's Fast & Furious, the fourth film in the series.

But before Letty could be resurrected, picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy and his crew would have to resurrect a few Jensens: four of them, and two survived filming.

Raw Stock
"There aren't any Interceptors that haven't rusted through left in England," McCarthy explains. "So all the Jensens in the new movie came out of California. That's where all the good ones are." It also helps explain why, though the major action featuring the Interceptor is set in Great Britain, it's a left-hand-drive model.

Instead of restoring the Interceptors to their original, leather-lined, wood-trimmed and high-gloss finish, it was decided that Letty's Jensen would be kind of menacing: finished in matte gray, with massive side pipes dumping out just forward of the rear wheels. But it's not an ancient Chrysler engine breathing out through those pipes.

To keep spares simple and allow the swapping of parts between cars, McCarthy powered many of the onscreen cars with GM "LS3" V8 crate engines straight out of the GM Performance Parts catalog. That's the same 6.2-liter engine that's standard in the Chevrolet Camaro SS and rated at 430 horsepower as shipped. And that's a net power rating: up 105 hp over the gross-rated 325 hp of the Interceptor's original Chrysler 383.

On three of the Jensen Interceptors, the Magnaflow side exhausts are functional. McCarthy omitted them from the fourth car because he didn't want Michelle Rodriguez to worry about burning her legs on them.

Behind the LS3 is a GM Turbo 400 three-speed automatic transmission feeding back to a Ford 9-inch solid axle rear end mounted on the Interceptor's leaf spring rear suspension (with new leaf springs to lower the car). To accommodate oversize 265/50R17 rear tires, McCarthy's crew widened the rear wheelwells. Four-wheel disc brakes from a 2010 Ford Mustang GT were adapted to the car.

Raw Inside
Jensen may have built the Interceptor as a luxury car, but it's a Spartan machine in Fast & Furious 6. Gone are the carpeting, the air-conditioning and anything else that hints at comfort. Instead there's a thick roll cage and two Sparco R100 seats. AutoMeter gauges fill the holes left behind by the Jensen's original instruments.

So this car is exactly what Jensen didn't intend it to be.
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:23 PM   #5
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Love the Ford escort and the Jensen interceptor
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:33 PM   #6
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The "Anvil" 1969 Ford Mustang-Roman's (Tyrese) vehicle











But of course the actual "workhorse cars" are not as perfect as "The Anvil"


Quote:
There's a total of nine Ford Mustangs used throughout the film, one of which dies a pretty gruesome death courtesy of a tank (according to the movie trailer). Some of the Mustangs were 1969 models, and a few of them were 1970s modified to look like '69s. The thing that's sure to get fans in an uproar are the General Motors LS3 V8 engines under the hoods of these ponies, too.
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:37 PM   #7
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:42 PM   #8
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona
Vin Diesel's Latest Charger Is a Daytona
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In the Fast & Furious movies, Dominic Toretto (played by Vin Diesel) has had a tempestuous and ongoing relationship with the 1970 Dodge Charger. But in this sixth film, cleverly titled Fast & Furious 6, he doesn't have a '70 Charger at all. Instead he drives a 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona.

It's the right car for the evolution of the Toretto character from a street racing punk in Los Angeles ripping off semis full of electronics in the first Fast & Furious movie, to the natural leader of a multiethnic family of highly competent international heist-meisters. It's a more sophisticated and sleeker machine for a character who has grown more sophisticated and sleek (in a Diesel-like way) over the 12 years since the series started.

For those of you cloistered off so that you don't know NASCAR, the Daytona was an aerodynamically enhanced version of the Charger built to compete on such high-speed superspeedways as Talladega and, yes, Daytona. Those enhancements consisted of a longer, sharklike nose, blisters on the top of the front fenders to allow the car to settle down over its tires, a flush-mounted rear window in place of the regular Charger's tunneled backlight and, of course, the tall rear wing to generate downforce in the clean air up there.

Built in response to Ford's long-nose Torino Talladega fastback, the Daytona was immediately successful on the track. And with Buddy Baker behind the wheel of Chrysler Engineering's number 88 car, on March 24, 1970 at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama, the Charger Daytona became the first NASCAR racecar to run a lap beyond 200 mph.

So there's already plenty of legend behind the Daytona even before it shows up in this movie. And, well, it's no surprise, but Dom's Daytona isn't really a Daytona at all.

Keep in mind that a production as large as Fast & Furious 6 needs multiple examples of every onscreen car to keep filming no matter what the contingency. And particular cars need to be built in particular ways to deal with particular stunts or appearances. So this isn't about just one Daytona, but seven built to portray Toretto's fictional machine. Three survived filming.

The Non-Daytona Daytona
With its extremely long nose and ridiculously high rear wing, an original 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona would be ill suited to cinematic stunt work, and at more than six figures for a good example, way too expensive. So picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy built a variation on the Daytona with a slightly shorter nose, a slightly less elevated rear wing and slammed it over a set of custom-made 18-inch wheels wearing 275/40R18 and 315/40R18 Nitto tires.

In fact, the entire front clip of Toretto's Daytona is one piece of fiberglass fabricated at McCarthy's 20,000-square-foot shop in Sun Valley, California. Compared to a production '69 Daytona, the Toretto Daytona's nose is almost 12 inches shorter overall and somewhat taller in profile. And the movie car's nose has fixed headlights under Plexiglas covers instead of the original's pop-up units.

"It would have been too much hassle with hidden headlights," explained McCarthy. "One would be up and the other down, so they wouldn't match shot-to-shot. Or they wouldn't work at all. Plus we didn't want to have to fix them every time the nose was damaged during filming. So we got rid of them."

The tail wing has been brought down by about 12 inches for a sleeker appearance. But because the wing is lower, the trunk lid now hits the bottom of the cross-piece when it's fully open. Fortunately, there's no scene in the movie where Dom needs to ferry luggage to the airport or bring home enough mulch to plant a garden.

The most impressive features on Toretto's Daytona, however, are its perfect stance, glorious maroon paint and slick details like the shaved rain gutters. For movie cars, these Daytonas are particularly well finished. Not showcar detailed, but dang nice.

Built To Go
To simplify construction of all the film cars, Dennis McCarthy's shop standardized several mechanical pieces across several cars to facilitate servicing and the availability of spares. So Toretto's Daytona, like several other vehicles in the film, is powered by GM's 6.2-liter LS3 V8 rated at 430 horsepower. Behind that on most of the Daytonas is a GM Turbo 400 three-speed automatic transmission. The power finally leads to a Ford 9-inch solid-axle rear end. Different gear ratios were installed in different Daytonas depending upon what each was going to do during filming.

And at least one Daytona was built with a four-speed manual transmission. Because, well, because.

Suspensionwise, the front end uses Reilly Motorsports' "AlterKtion" coil-over system in place of the stock torsion bars, and the tail is held up by Reilly's "triangulated four-bar" system, which mixes coil springs and five links together. The braking systems use Brembo calipers at all four corners, with a second set of calipers for the rear wheels hooked up to a separate braking circuit so stunt drivers could induce some sideways attitude when it was needed.

For a Mopar addict, everything is super-cool and awesome. If it weren't for that dang GM engine and transmission. And Ford rear end.

The Vin Chamber
Inside, Toretto's Daytona is pure minimalism. Forget everything Dodge did originally except the door handles; the car is finished in custom-made aluminum panels, a roll cage, AutoMeter gauges, simple switches and a pair of Premier Racing Products low-back seats. And forget the rear seat altogether, as that space has been taken over by a pair of Magnaflow mufflers exiting out each side through holes cut into the quarter panels.

Get into a Toretto Daytona, turn on the electric system, hit the start switch and the thing roars to life as if you were sitting in a small-block-powered drum with an aftermarket exhaust system — which is essentially what you're doing. And when the exhaust system heats up, so does the cockpit, even when the side windows are down.

Those demerits aside, this beast actually feels like a real car from behind the wheel. Thanks to rack-and-pinion steering, there's even some road feel that was completely absent back when Dodge built the original. Toretto, we'd guess, wouldn't care.
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:45 PM   #9
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Cool info...
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:47 PM   #10
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 2012 Dodge Charger SRT8
Dominic Toretto's Battleship Gray Charger SRT8
Quote:
In the Fast & Furious universe, the most intimidating car is always whatever Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) is driving. And usually what's under Toretto's butt is a Dodge Charger of some sort: either old or new. In Fast & Furious 6 (as in Fast Five), while Toretto drives an old Charger through much of the film, in the end he does most of his heist work with a new Charger. In this latest case it's the most powerful Charger of them all, the SRT8 with a 470-horsepower, 6.4-liter Hemi V8 under its hood.

Dodge has long supported the Fast & Furious films by supplying vehicles, and it shipped 11 new 2012 Charger SRT8s to Dennis McCarthy's picture car department for this film. And because they were brand-new cars, there wasn't much that McCarthy's crew had to do to mechanically prepare them for movie hero work. But there was some cosmetic work that needed to be done.

Up Grayed
In early 2012 McCarthy organized a developmental test session for the Fast & Furious 6 cars at California's Willow Springs Raceway. And there, amid all the fabricated insanity McCarthy's shop had produced, was one black SRT8 that looked as if it had just come off the lot at Glendale Dodge Chrysler Jeep. It, and its red leather interior, seemed almost out of place.

A year later the same car is gray, wearing 20-inch Viper wheels, equipped with front and rear nerf bars and some brackets on its roof, and the interior has been turned black. And while it showed only a few hundred miles on its odometer, those had clearly been very tough miles. Such is the hard life of a movie star.

As anyone who has seen the film's trailer knows, the SRT8's role is at the climax where it, along with some Alfas, brings down a Russian Antonov cargo plane that's trying to take off. And it does it with the help of a Warn winch mounted to a tubular steel bracket in the trunk. Plausible? Hey, if you're still in the audience by the end of the movie you've already bought in anyhow.

And it looks cool bursting through the Antonov's nose.

Easygoing but Hard-Core
The Sparco front seats aren't as accommodating as the SRT8's original thrones and there are a relatively well-hidden roll cage and four extra buttons on the steering wheel hub, but otherwise the interior of this FF6 Charger is a pure Chrysler product. That is if you don't count the black paint peeling off some of the surfaces.

So the SRT8 starts with the press of a button and it settles into... well, the usual idle one gets with the Hemi. It's all so very close to almost ordinary. Then there are those four buttons on the steering wheel: putatively one pair operates the winch and the other the nitrous system. NOS!!! Not that there's actually a nitrous system installed.

Still, the 2012 Dodge Charger SRT8 is a very powerful and very fast car. It's not quick enough that it will do wheelies. Unless, of course, Dominic Toretto is driving.

His cars always do wheelies.
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:50 PM   #11
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 2012 Lucra LC470
A Supporting Player in the Car Cast
Quote:
In the world of Fast & Furious, some cars are stars... and some are destined to be background players. In Fast & Furious 6 this 2012 Lucra LC470 was originally cast for a larger part in the film, but that shrank down as filming proceeded.

"You can call it Tej's car," says picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy, referring to the tech-savvy character portrayed by Ludacris. "But he acts as a lookout in the film. And while the car is next to him, it doesn't do much in the way of stunts or hard driving."

Still, in anticipation of more extensive use, McCarthy had three on hand. One is a complete LC470 built by Lucra in the United States using a GM LS7 7.0-liter V8 (as in the Corvette Z06) and a Tremec five-speed manual transmission. The other two were rolling chassis supplied by Lucra that were fitted with 430-horsepower, 6.2-liter LS3 V8 crate engines and Turbo 400 three-speed automatic transmissions for stunt work.

That's stunt work they'd never do. "We were doing one scene with an old Land Rover that couldn't keep up," reports McCarthy. "So we ended up pulling the engine and transmission out of one of the stunt Lucras and putting them in that vehicle."

Slick Beyond Slick
While its role was reduced in the film, the 2012 Lucra LC470 is obviously a potent machine. It looks sort of like an old Jaguar D-Type that's been cross-bred with a Shelby Cobra and then had its DNA baked in a TVR kiln. It's not precisely evocative of anything, yet it's reminiscent of just about everything.

The structure under that carbon-fiber body is a straightforward tube-frame chassis supported on aluminum suspension links swiped from under a C4 Corvette and coil-over shocks. At least that's what Lucra's Web site says; the car Edmunds.com photographed had specially crafted adjustable front suspension links. The front 17-inch wheels are encased in 275/40R17 Nitto NT01 tires, while the rears wear 315/35R17 Nittos. Of course there are big PBR 13-inch disc brakes behind each of those wheels.

The LC470 weighs just a touch more than 2,000 pounds and actually has a slight rearward weight balance. The engine sits practically in the middle of the 96-inch wheelbase, well behind the front wheels. And when the 505 hp of the LS7 V8 only has a ton to shove around, the result is explosive acceleration. Lucra claims zero to 60 mph takes only 2.5 seconds, with a stupendous 9.4-second trip through the quarter-mile.

It's light, it has massive tires, it's hugely powerful and the suspension looks trick. But all those performance claims need to be backed up with an independent test, and that's something we haven't done. Yet.

The Bomber
Compared to a Corvette, Porsche or Ferrari, much of the 2012 Lucra LC470 seems crude and only half-finished. But when the LS7 blasts to life, thunder roars from those massive side pipes and every imperfection vanishes. There's not only a lot of performance potential in this car; there's a lot of drama pent up in its character.

The whole world knows that a seventh Fast & Furious is coming next summer. Maybe that will be the Lucra's next big break.
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:51 PM   #12
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The pre-production movie Lucra's were white and black before they decided on the Green and Yellow






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Old 05-31-2013, 12:13 AM   #13
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What happens to the 2nd Gen Camaro???

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Old 05-31-2013, 12:27 AM   #14
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Man, that Anvil mustang is HOT! Saw it at SEMA. Steve Strope is definitely one of the top builders in the country. Didn't know it was gonna be in this movie. Now I gotta go see it!
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Old 05-31-2013, 12:37 AM   #15
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: Custom-Built Ramp Car
Not Just Evil, Not Just a Car, a Weapon
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In any movie, the heroes can only prove their goodness by going up against truly nasty villains. In Fast & Furious 6, what the truly nasty villains are driving is this: a custom built, wedge-shaped, tube frame, midengine, four-wheel-steering monster. Call it the "ramp car" or the "flip car" or whatever. What it ultimately is, well, is evil.

But even evil deserves its due.

The Story's Needs
Over the previous five Fast & Furious films it's been established that Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) and his adopted family of good guy thieves are likely the best driving crew on earth. But likely isn't certainty and in Fast & Furious 6, Toretto's bunch meets its evil twins. That is, evil twins as in a squadron of drivers that parallel Toretto's group, but are evil.

And evil people do evil things. Like drive into other cars, forcing them to fly up in the air and crash spectacularly. So that's what the ramp car is designed to do: get underneath other cars and throw them up into the air. So it's not just a car, but a weapon.

When originally conceived, says picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy, the ramp car was going to be something massive: a big truck with some sort of foldable contraption on its nose. But director Justin Lin thought, since the story took place in Europe, the ramp car should be something closer to a Formula 1-style car. So McCarthy went back and designed something from scratch. It would work with the story and look something like an F1 car, but it really has nothing to do with F1 at all. In the end, he built seven.

Truck Meets Ferrari
An F1 car is, by its nature, a high-tech machine. Dennis McCarthy's ramp car, on the other hand, is built to be rugged, reliable and simple. After all, it's not built to race; it's built to perform in the fantasy world of a movie.

So forget exotic materials like carbon fiber or a power plant that spins up to some five-digit number. The ramp car is built around a ladder frame made from 3-by-6-inch rectangular steel tubing with a lattice of welded steel tubes above that. The front suspension comes from a 3/4-ton mid-'80s GM pickup truck with air springs replacing the original coils. In back there's a Dana 60 solid rear axle held up on another pair of airbags and located by three links. The steering is hydraulic both front and rear, with the front operated by a conventional steering wheel and the rear by a lever similar to that used on a monster truck.

There are three separated passenger pods on the ramp car, but only the center one has driving controls. The other two pods were supposed to be used by supplemental bad guys in another chase scene that was eventually cut from the script and wasn't filmed.

"I used to stick with carbureted engines because I thought they were simple," said McCarthy. "But then I realized that the young mechanics I was hiring didn't have any experience with carbs anyhow. So I've been going with fuel-injected crate engines ever since."

So the ramp car uses the same 6.2-liter LS3 V8 from the GM Performance catalog that McCarthy has installed in other vehicles for the film. Rated at 430 horsepower in the catalog, it's essentially the same engine that powers the Chevrolet Camaro SS.

But the LS3 is mounted backward in the ramp car. It sends power into a GM Turbo 400 three-speed automatic transmission that in turn churns a Casale V-drive gearset that's mounted just behind the driver. The V-drive reverses the power flow so a small driveshaft can then feed the rear axle. It's almost ridiculously simple.

Big and Brawny
While the ramp car is very low, it's also very long and very wide, stretching out about 160 inches over a 130-inch wheelbase. It's so big overall that its massive Hoosier 31-by-16.5-inch Pro Street rear tires (think 419/55R17) look almost modestly sized. And the front tires (315/35R17 Hoosiers) are the same size as the rear tires on the old 1995 Corvette ZR-1.

This car isn't built for convenience. Getting to the driver's pod means stepping around a bunch of tubing, stepping past some Plexiglas, and then lowering yourself into the narrow seat. And you have to be careful, too, because the steel is bare and unpainted; it's rusty and if you scratch yourself you're going to need a tetanus shot. Your legs straddle a hydraulic ram that operates the "kicker" that, at least in the context of the story, knocks cars up and over the cockpit. The OMP steering wheel is attached after your body is in place.

The cockpit is strictly business, more open-air fighter jet than car. A Racepak digital dash sits behind the steering wheel just above Autometer oil pressure and ammeters. Your right leg bounces up against the transmission's ratchet shifter while your left knocks on the Eaton lever that controls the hydraulic rear-wheel steering. This is an open car that somehow feels claustrophobic.

The Roar
The ramp car's custom headers have individual pipes for each cylinder that snake over the engine and wind up in two collectors just under the rear wing. From an ultimate efficiency standpoint it's probably not ideal to have the exhaust surround the air intake, but this isn't a car built for efficiency; it's built to look wicked cool onscreen. That it achieves.

And when it's running, it roars. Considering the exhaust system, it's probably not surprising that it sounds more like an offshore boat than a car, but there's a rumble aboard that announces it as a large-displacement American V8. Not that you'll hear that in the film.

Virtually none of the cars in Fast & Furious 6 supply their own voices. It's simply a matter of not being able to record usable sound during filming and the ambition to make sure every vehicle sounds extraordinary. So in the film, the ramp cars sound like F1 cars... even though its engine is clearly an LS3 in several shots.

And almost no one is likely to notice.
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:11 AM   #16
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I completely fell in love with that "charger daytona". It's an absolutely beautiful car! It also sounds amazing in the movie! I saw a superbird conversion challenger at texas mile and man do they look cool... this one just takes the cake though!
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Old 05-31-2013, 01:12 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by jlugo View Post
What happens to the 2nd Gen Camaro???

If I'm not mistaken, it's either in the street race gathering scene or in the final scene as one of the cars that's bought at the end.
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Old 05-31-2013, 02:59 AM   #18
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That Camaro belongs to a guy I race with. He drives the hell out of that car. He drives it in C prepared at the local autox. It only had one quick shot of it in the movie.
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Old 05-31-2013, 04:55 AM   #19
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Quote:
In the structured world of Fast & Furious movies, the endings are now foregone conclusions. After all the action is over, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) and Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) will be left alone at the end with two nasty-ass supercars. Beefy Dom's will be some sort of insane Mopar, and super-dreamy Brian's will be a Nissan GT-R. And at the end of Fast & Furious 6 this is Brian's GT-R: quite likely one of the meanest on earth. And yet, still super-dreamy.

"When I saw this car at SEMA in 2011," said picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy, "I knew it was going to be in the movie. It was just a question of where."

Built by The R's Tuning shop in Irvine, California, the most obvious element in this R35 GT-R's ludicrous visual assault is a full BenSopra body kit that includes a tilt front end and the sort of overkill detailing that would have it kicked off Venus for being unrestrained. But that's just the matte metallic blue cover on the Superball underneath.

This thing is seriously monstrous. No, there weren't any replicas built for the film. Yes, the single 2010 Nissan GT-R that is in the film survived intact.

Brute Force
Go to a Nissan dealer and buy a 2031 Nissan GT-R and you instantly own one of the quickest cars on earth. Just make the payments and don't screw with it and you'll enjoy dozens and dozens of miles of high-speed fun before something breaks. But why settle for awesome?

A Switzer P800 turbo kit is at the heart of this fortification. That kit includes new ball-bearing turbochargers, high-pressure wastegate actuators, a revised intake, Niagra-spec fuel injectors and two massive intercoolers that could knock a steel furnace's output down to that of a kitchen match. Switzer claims its package is enough to slam output of the GT-R's VR38DETT 3.8-liter twin-turbo V6 up from 485 horsepower stock (2010 model) to a full 800 hp. There are entire religions based around the worship of less power.

Of course there are more tweaks baked into this power plant including a Cobb Accessport AP005 flashing the ECU, HKS plumbing and a sump full of Motul 300V oil. The R's shop fabricated the exhaust system itself and built the cooling system to keep all the fluids' temperatures reasonable. Let's assume the engine is at about 850 hp and leave it at that.

The seven-speed rear transaxle has been left pretty much alone and, according to the guys at The R's, has already survived many hard launches. Good luck with that.

Grounded
While Nissan's all-wheel-drive system is essentially intact, the pavement contact patches are now 290-millimeter Yokohama Advan A005 racing slicks at each corner. Those donuts are mounted on AdvanRacing GT 20-by-11-inch ETS wheels.

It's in keeping those tires square to the ground that The R's has done most of its work. R's fabricated its own camber adjusters and fitted JRZ RS Pro coil-over shock absorbers. The brakes are carbon-ceramic discs from Weapons Grade Performance clamped by CCM brake pads.

This is a car built for time attack and other track events. It may be shown on the street in Fast & Furious 6, but that's not reality. It's. A. Movie.

Body Beyond Belief
Get hit on the back of your head with a shovel, then smear some Vaseline on your eyeballs and squint really hard. If you do all that, maybe, just maybe, this car still looks like a stock GT-R. In fact, every body panel on this extravagantly styled ogre has been massaged or swapped.

Besides the BenSopra body kit that includes the dugout fenders and strakes, the doors have been replaced with Seibon Dry Carbon replicas. The door sills are carbon fiber and also come from Seibon. There are AMS Performance dry carbon roof and trunk panels and a giant BenSopra rear wing. This isn't borderline ridiculous; this is ridiculousness that blows up the borderline and then makes fun of convention.

Inside, the flamboyance is toned down in favor of a stark, businesslike seriousness. Forget things like door panels and carpeting; those have been replaced with felt and nylon door pulls. The R's built its own roll cage and then shoved aside the stock seats in favor of Sparco Circuit Racing seats, and the stock steering wheel is replaced by a Sparco piece. There are also plenty of exposed wires, serious-looking seatbelts and racy safety stuff.

If you weigh more than 200 pounds, it'll take you all day to climb through the roll cage only to find that your ass doesn't fit in this GT-R's seat. Literally.

Totem
In Fast & Furious 6 this 2010 Nissan GT-R's appearance isn't much more than a cameo. But cars that show up at the end of Fast & Furious movies often wind up being featured in the next one. So look for this car next July when the already announced seventh Fast & Furious film in the series opens in every theater on earth.
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Old 05-31-2013, 05:27 AM   #20
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Fast & Furious 6 Cars: 1970 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda
This Hard-Core Custom Gets a Small Part
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Some cars are just too nice to send flying through the air to a crunching doom. Take this 1970 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda, which is wicked awesome from the air cleaner atop its stupendous 540-cubic-inch (8.8-liter) old-school Hemi to the all-independent rear suspension. So how did this stunning machine find itself amid the destruction of Fast & Furious 6?

Simple. It isn't a movie car.

Instead, this showcar was borrowed from a collection called Autotopia that happens to be located in a building directly across the alley from picture car coordinator Dennis McCarthy's shop. It is owned by Erik Davis, who is president of RT Specialty Insurance in Los Angeles and who races a Mustang in the Pirelli World Challenge series under the Always Evolving Performance (AE Performance) banner.

It's only seen in the final shots of the film, when Dominic Toretto's ad hoc family gathers together at a house familiar to hard-core Fast & Furious fans going back to the original 2001 film, The Fast and the Furious. So there was no need to build duplicates.

Sorry, is that a spoiler? Really? You didn't know that Dom survives to the end and winds up in a bitchin' Mopar?

The Real Thing
Built by Dave Salvaggio of Salvaggio Automotive Design in Port Washington, Wisconsin, this 'Cuda is overstuffed with virtually every trick known to Mopar man. But those tricks are all subtle. Like the instrumentation that is set into a carbon-fiber panel and uses white faces, but retains the original font and design of each gauge. And then there's the pistol-grip shifter atop the Tremec six-speed manual transmission that has been remade in carbon fiber — as if it were for a much better gun.

Even the leather-covered seats are Mopar parts. Swiped as they are from a Viper.

But what's not subtle is the engine. That's an Arruzza-built, aluminum-headed elephant engine capped by twin four-barrel carburetors. It incorporates a beautifully machined and polished aluminum plate on the front that uses a single serpentine belt to drive the alternator, A/C compressor and power steering pump. And the entire engine bay is so heartbreakingly beautiful it makes you want to rip off the car's hood.

Likely the single most ambitious element in this car is the suspension. The front suspension's original torsion bars and A-arms have been dumped in favor of fabricated pieces and coil-over shocks.

Out back, the crummy leaf springs have vanished. In their place is a Jaguar center section with inboard Wilwood disc brakes and fabricated links that form a robust structure. There should be a hole in the trunk floor to provide better views of it.

There's nothing that isn't interesting about the 1970 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda. And nothing that's been left untouched.

Body Parts
Thanks to 235/45R17 front and 305/45R18 rear Nitto red-striped tires on Fikse wheels, this Plymouth Barracuda has a slight rake and its nose is almost burrowing into the ground. There are many subtle body modifications (like re-contoured wheelwells) but, again, the whole car is constrained by a respect for Mopar heritage.

So while it's Hemi powered, it's actually decorated like the 340-powered AAR 'Cuda that was built to homologate components for SCCA Trans Am road racing. The big engine seems to almost be bursting up into the cavity made by the AAR hood scoop. That's kind of cool. But not as truly icy as the AAR-inspired dual side exhausts that exit just below each door's trailing edge.

The mix of gloss and matte black paint is sinister, consistent with the 'Cuda's themes, and intensely badass.

The Future
While the 1970 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda's appearance in Fast & Furious 6 is basically a cameo, Fast & Furious 7 is already in production and aiming for a summer 2014 release. If that movie picks up where this one lets off, this 'Cuda (and/or its stunt-ready clones) is sure to show up then.
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Old 05-31-2013, 07:48 AM   #21
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I want a ramp car
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Old 05-31-2013, 10:47 AM   #22
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Cool pics and info.
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Old 05-31-2013, 04:29 PM   #23
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Old 05-31-2013, 04:37 PM   #24
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They didn't really use the '67 Camaro either. I told my sister that Dom and the family would have beaten the bad guy much faster with the '67. Instead they had to use the Mustang as an anchor.

Thanks for all the info. It would be awesome to work at that shop; except when te cars get destroyed.
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Old 05-31-2013, 09:27 PM   #25
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They didn't really use the '67 Camaro either. I told my sister that Dom and the family would have beaten the bad guy much faster with the '67. Instead they had to use the Mustang as an anchor.
Yeah they kept it back at the hideout.

But I guess after seeing what happen to the Mustang it's a good thing it stayed at home!
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