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Old 06-12-2013, 09:36 PM   #35
TexasChile
 
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Originally Posted by Irnwkrkev View Post
You can't compare a DOHC motor to a pushrod motor with equal displacement.

The added displacement of the pushrod motor is one of it's inherent advantages.

A DOHC motor must be smaller to fit in the same space and weigh the same.

Get over the displacement and look at the engines for what they are!
The Ford GT 500 has a larger motor than the 5.0 and it fits in the Mustang just fine and it produces a lot more HP than the ZL1. I think your statements above are exaggerated--the weight, size, center of gravity, etc. are not as big a difference as you make them out to be. What little difference there is in those factors is far outweighed by the pure HP advantage per cubic inch of the overhead cam design.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:40 PM   #36
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Which one produces more HP per cubic inch, and it is not even close. Nothing you wrote is correct. The LS is a bigger motor. I guess by your logic the LS3 should produce the same HP as the LS7. Bigger motors will produce more HP than a smaller motor, all things being equal.

Look, you can kid yourself all you want, but the overhead cam design produces more HP per cubic inch and is a better design than pushrods. If you don't believe that then I will let you believe what you want to believe.
Why more hp / cubic inch?

Why not more hp / lb (engine weight)?

Why not hp / number of valves?

Why not hp / number of cams ?

I have given you category after category of where pushrod motors are superior and you focus on one.

Do you not understand that displacement is limited on the 5.0 due to packaging. You have theoretical gains based on displacement but don't you understand that engine has to go into a car under a good and the packaging problems of a overhead cam engine restrict displacement.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:41 PM   #37
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You just don't get it.

You don't understand about the physical size of the engines. The weight and where it's placed in the engines. The cost of manufacturing the engines. The amount of parts in the engines. The fuel economy of the engines.

Here's another example:

Boat motors. With 4-stroke motors why do they still make 2-stroke motors?
They weigh less
They make more torque
They have less parts
They are cheaper to manufacture

There's more then one way to skin a cat. Just because two of the largest automobile manufacturers decided to embrace pushrod engines doesn't meat they are antiquated.

With todays technology you have pushrod engines that can rev from 600 to 7,000rpm without a hiccup. They are light, small in size, big in displacement, cheaper to produce, reliable.

With direct injection, multi displacement, and VVT they are only going to get better. Just wait until the C7 corvette's LT1 engine has some time to develop an aftermarket following!
I disagree with everything you wrote above. There is no big weight or size disadvantage at all or all small cars would be using pushrod motors. You must live in a bubble. Look what all other cars are using. Why does GM use overhead cams in their 4 and 6 cylinder cars? Why not use push rods in the V6? I can tell you the answer. HP per cubic inch. You must be kidding about fuel economy. I guess Honda civics should be using push rod motors. Cost, long term reliability, etc.? Again, look at the Japanese economy cars. What are they using? Your arguments don't match up with reality or the facts or we would see the other manufactures using them. Your boat motor example is wrong too but I won't type a book on all of this. LOL.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:42 PM   #38
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Again, if push rod motors are so great, why are all economy cars, motorcycles, and other cars using overhead cams? If fuel economy is so good with pushrod motors, why are all economy cars using overhead cams? In short, the facts do not back up anything you are saying. Look at other cars. Where are all your great pushrod motors?
Some are leaders in the industry and others are sheep that follow.

Where do those cars originate from? What markets are they marketed in and do those countries have tier licensing based on displacement or taxes?
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:44 PM   #39
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I disagree with everything you wrote above. There is no big weight or size disadvantage at all or all small cars would be using pushrod motors. You must live in a bubble. Look what all other cars are using. Why does GM use overhead cams in their 4 and 6 cylinder cars? Why not use push rods in the V6? I can tell you the answer. HP per cubic inch. You must be kidding about fuel economy. I guess Honda civics should be using push rod motors. Cost, long term reliability, etc.? Again, look at the Japanese economy cars. What are they using? Your arguments don't match up with reality or the facts or we would see the other manufactures using them. Your boat motor example is wrong too but I won't type a book on all of this. LOL.
The japanese have very lame motors. The corolla has been using the same 1.8L engine for over a decade producing the same enemic 130 hp.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:46 PM   #40
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I disagree with everything you wrote above. There is no big weight or size disadvantage at all or all small cars would be using pushrod motors. You must live in a bubble. Look what all other cars are using. Why does GM use overhead cams in their 4 and 6 cylinder cars? Why not use push rods in the V6? I can tell you the answer. HP per cubic inch. You must be kidding about fuel economy. I guess Honda civics should be using push rod motors. Cost, long term reliability, etc.? Again, look at the Japanese economy cars. What are they using? Your arguments don't match up with reality or the facts or we would see the other manufactures using them. Your boat motor example is wrong too but I won't type a book on all of this. LOL.
So then why did GM chose to stay with pushrods when they designed the new small block motor?
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:46 PM   #41
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Why more hp / cubic inch?

Why not more hp / lb (engine weight)?

Why not hp / number of valves?

Why not hp / number of cams ?

I have given you category after category of where pushrod motors are superior and you focus on one.

Do you not understand that displacement is limited on the 5.0 due to packaging. You have theoretical gains based on displacement but don't you understand that engine has to go into a car under a good and the packaging problems of a overhead cam engine restrict displacement.
Displacement is not limited in an overhead cam motor. That is a myth. And overhead cam motors do not weigh more per cubic inch than a pushrod motor. Another myth. The reason overhead cam motors are smaller is because they can get the HP they need with less displacement--more HP per cubic inch. That is also why all cars (other than GM V8 and Dodge V8) use overhead cams. All cars. Do you not understand that fact. The pushrod motor is an obsolete design.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:48 PM   #42
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Displacement is not limited in an overhead cam motor. That is a myth. And overhead cam motors do not weigh more per cubic inch than a pushrod motor. Another myth. The reason overhead cam motors are smaller is because they can get the HP they need with less displacement--more HP per cubic inch. That is also why all cars (other than GM V8 and Dodge V8) use overhead cams. All cars. Do you not understand that fact. The pushrod motor is an obsolete design.
The reason overhead cam motors exist is because some countries liscence and tax based on displacement and the only way you can get any power out of a smaller motor is to spin the piss out of it and overhead cams help with that. Do you not understand that? It's governed more by stupid law and taxes than a technical advantage.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:49 PM   #43
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The japanese have very lame motors. The corolla has been using the same 1.8L engine for over a decade producing the same enemic 130 hp.
That is not true. The HP has increased over the years. I have owned them and know that. I could google the numbers to prove that you are wrong on HP, but I will let you do that. The motor is also not the same. The engine has been complete redesigned several times. The size may be the same, but that is about all.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:52 PM   #44
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That is not true. The HP has increased over the years. I have owned them and know that. I could google the numbers to prove that you are wrong on HP, but I will let you do that. The motor is also not the same. The engine has been complete redesigned several times. The size may be the same, but that is about all.
You want to prove it, then you google it.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:52 PM   #45
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The reason overhead cam motors exist is because some countries liscence and tax based on displacement and they only way you can get any power out of a smaller motor is to spin the piss out of it and overhead cams help with that. Do you know understand that? It's governed more by stupid law and taxes than a technical advantage.
It is not the spinning that produces the HP. It is the more efficient design of the overhead cam. It is true that pushrod motors cannot rev as high because all of that extra drivetrain (lifters, pushrods, rocker arms) float at higher rpms.

It is true that countries do require smaller motors, but even if they allowed larger motors, those motors would not be pushrod motors. Only GM and Dodge believe in that technology, and then only in the V8. They have conceded the point in the V6 an 4 cylinder.
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:53 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by TexasChile View Post
Displacement is not limited in an overhead cam motor. That is a myth. And overhead cam motors do not weigh more per cubic inch than a pushrod motor. Another myth. The reason overhead cam motors are smaller is because they can get the HP they need with less displacement--more HP per cubic inch. That is also why all cars (other than GM V8 and Dodge V8) use overhead cams. All cars. Do you not understand that fact. The pushrod motor is an obsolete design.
LOL at all the myths. Who's really in a bubble!

If it's obsolete why are two of the largest automobile manufacturers making them to this day and have them planned for well into the future?

Today's pushrod engines can hold their own. The LS9 was the highest horsepower V8 engine produced until the GT500 came out in 2013!
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:55 PM   #47
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You want to prove it, then you google it.
I don't need to prove it. I know it for a fact. I have owned a couple of Corollas over the years. The variable valve timing and fuel injection and other things along increased the HP over the old carburetor motors. It is also common sense. I could prove it with a google search, but I think we both know you are wrong so what is the point. Are you still saying you are correct?
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:59 PM   #48
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So then why did GM chose to stay with pushrods when they designed the new small block motor?
I really do not know the answer to that. I read different reasons from GM, but their story keeps changing. To be honest, it does not make sense why they are sticking with pushrod motors.

Of course, it does not make sense to me that GM uses fiberglass for the corvette when no other manufacturer of high end sports cars uses it.
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:00 PM   #49
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The coyote puts out 440 HP in the Boss 302, and it does it with a much smaller motor. You don't seem to understand that larger motors produce more HP. The LS3 is much larger than the 5.0. The weight is almost the same-no big difference. Again, if the pushrod motor is so great, why are all the other cars (other than Dodge) not using them in any of their cars, including their small cars. It's not brain washing, its facts and logic.

It does it with less DISPLACEMENT, not a smaller engine. It also has CNC ported heads, different cams and different exhaust. It's not a direct comparison to the LS3.

DOHC engines have
higher center of gravity
larger external dimensions
weight less

Most cars are not V8s. Most are 4 bangers or V6s which do not have the same packaging problems as a DOCH V8.
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:01 PM   #50
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I have owned a couple of Corollas over the years.
You sir have just lost all credability!
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:01 PM   #51
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LOL at all the myths. Who's really in a bubble!

If it's obsolete why are two of the largest automobile manufacturers making them to this day and have them planned for well into the future?

Today's pushrod engines can hold their own. The LS9 was the highest horsepower V8 engine produced until the GT500 came out in 2013!
I cannot answer your question regarding why GM is still using the pushrod design in their V8 yet they don't use the pushrod design in the V6 and 4 cylinder. It defies logic.
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