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Old 03-26-2014, 11:32 AM   #26
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This post has been EXTREMELY helpful guys, first HPDE event this sunday at Homestead. I feel much better planning my day with all of this info.
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:18 AM   #27
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I'm in the process of packing for a 2-day event at NJMP tomorrow and Saturday (1 day on each of the 2 courses). A few more things have occurred to me this morning.

Tarp (to cover all the stuff you'll bring)
Weights (to hold the tarp down)
Strap-on knee pads (your knees will thank me for this one)
Slide-lock plastic bags to keep loose stuff organized and even less likely to get wet.


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Old 03-28-2014, 10:55 AM   #28
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Great idea and write up TBone!!!

THIS IS NOT A RACE!

Kind regards,

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Old 03-28-2014, 05:06 PM   #29
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I would take No Residue duct tape with me. Useful for a lot of things but I would use it for numbering and taping off fenders. More robust than the blue painters tape, didn't start peeling off halfway through the day and didn't hurt paint at all. Even stuck well to fresh wax and looks way better than the blue painters tape b
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Old 03-28-2014, 08:22 PM   #30
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Thumbs up SAFETY EQUIPMENT

I found this on Jalopnik and thought it was an excellent article about safety equipment that I could not have written better so I copied it here.


http://jalopnik.com/the-jalopnik-gui...d-w-1548620470
Quote:
The Jalopnik Guide To Buying Racing Gear (For Men And Women)

By Stef Schrader

If you intend on driving a racecar—even if it's a total crapcan—you're going to have to look the part. Bonus: all of that Stiggy get-up prevents you from going up in flames if and/or when your questionable machinery decides it doesn't like its fuel lines anymore, hooray!


So, you guessed it: here's more safety gear you'll need to acquire to go crapcan racing (or any racing, for that matter) that's outside the $500 budget. Most teams leave this up to individual drivers since it's stuff you can reuse to hop onto any team, anywhere, although some teams decide to go all-out on matching gear as part of a theme.

Each series has its own set of rules regarding how current drivers' equipment needs to be, which certifications they look for and what they require. The 24 Hours of LeMons and ChumpCar tend to err on the side of affordability, but less budget-oriented organizations often tend to be a bit more strict about items' age and the type of head and neck restraint you can use. P

Look up the rules for the series you'd like to run before you enter an event. Also, make sure that all of the tags certifying your gear are easy to find since that is what groups use to check that everything's in spec. If you're unsure of where a sticker or tag is sewn on, ask for it to be pointed out when you buy it.

So, there's problem #1: buying it.

Shopping is Irritating

There are certain items I don't mind shopping for: vintage Fisher-Price stuffed animals, racecar parts and delicious cheeses, for example. All of these have one thing in common: I don't have to try them on. Ever.

To state the obvious, people tend to be different sizes. Some are more "normal" than others, making it a lot easier for them to buy clothes off the rack. I, however, am a short person with tiny hands, tiny feet and large boobs. Very few things ever fit me as they were designed to fit. On top of that, very few items involving racecars are designed to accommodate boobs or hips in the first place—but I'll get to that shortly.

Worse yet is the fact that racing gear is a fairly limited market. Unless you live near a track or in a large city where you're more likely to find a specialty shop that caters to racers, your options are limited to a catalog or the Internet. Maybe this is because I am an oddball size, but I prefer to try things on in person to minimize the amount of returns I have to make. Living in a place where you don't have a store nearby sucks.

Fortunately, most of the gear you're looking for is far less annoying to buy than stupid prom dresses that never fit right because they list actual measurements, and usually do so in a somewhat detailed manner. Even if you're buying from another racer instead of a store, the size charts are often just a Google away.

Furthermore, most shops are more than happy to tell you which items run small, run large or have any other kinds of distinct fit characteristics if you simply ask them. Most of the larger vendors such as SafeRacer or OG Racing are incredibly responsive via email or phone, as are some of the manufacturers themselves. Simpson's factory store, for example, is one of the most downright pleasant bunch of people I've shopped with.

Stuff to Acquire

I say acquire since it's possible to rent or borrow gear if you're headed far away from home for a race or just don't think you'll do this very often. So, what's the shopping list?

Driving Suit

These are the one- or two-piece grownup onesies that are probably going to be the most difficult item to get to fit 100% right. It's the same problem I have with stupid dresses: off-the-rack, they're made to fit a certain shape that I'm just not. Rather, these are usually made to fit the average dude shape.

Luckily, these end up looking so awkward on so many people that few seem to care if yours is a little off. It's a race, not a fashion show. It's also preferable for these suits to be a little loose in places since that extra air between your skin and the material is better for fire protection. On the other hand, if the worst-case scenario occurs and you have to get out of your car immediately, you need to be able to move quickly without snagging on anything, so be wary of having too much extra material on your person as well.

Single-layer SFI 3.2/A1 suits are the minimum for most crapcan series, but they mandate that you wear a full set of fireproof underwear under them. If you'd prefer more protection and/or going commando under everything, look for a multi-layer SFI 3.2/A5 or higher rated suit.

There are advantages to both. Some people in warmer climates prefer the single-layer suits since they're an inexpensive option that is fairly cool. Unless you're doing ChumpCar's ice racing series or something, thicker options like drag racing suits are less preferable to the lighter SFI 3.2/A5 suits geared towards road racing. You're in a little box where all the comfort items have usually been taken out to save weight and install a roll cage. It gets hot in there, even in climates where you wouldn't expect to be anything except cold. Pricier SFI 3.2/A5 suits often build in extra ways to draw out heat. The upper end of the market is crazy, with super-light materials, designs made specifically for being comfortable while sitting and cooling panels galore.

If you really want to make sure your Giant Grown-up Onesie fits, you can order a custom suit. Many companies will make one for you if you send in your measurements. Stand21 is towards the pricier end of things, with custom suits starting somewhere around $2500 for a basic suit but can easily be optioned up to $3500 depending on custom graphics and other options. Also, they've got a whole collection of licensed Porsche stuff. (I'm going to throw that note in there for when I strike oil in my yard, 'k.)

Alternately, you can order an off-the-rack suit and get it tailored afterwards if there's any part that's really baggy or out of place. Buying one already in a certain size can be as cheap as $100 or so for a decent single-layer onesie, and can reach near $2,000 for one of the newest ultralight multi-layer suits.

Two-piece suits are also an option if you're a drastically different size on top than you are on the bottom, or if you'd just prefer dealing with two pieces instead of one. The bottoms are often absurdly comfortable since they're just quilted pajama pants that are socially acceptable to wear at a racetrack. Having a two-piece suit means that you can just take off the top half and loaf in the pants all day without fear of dragging the top half through something you shouldn't.

Although there's a smaller market for female-shaped anything, some manufacturers actually cater to it. Simpson and Alpinestars make off-the-rack woman-shaped suits, and Lady Eagle specializes in custom ladies' gear.

The same issue with buying one off the rack is exactly the issue that sets off horrible flashbacks from formal shopping: things fit everyone differently. Although the Alpinestars women's suit looks like it's roughly my wacky dimensions in the middle where I'm hardest to fit, I know that most of their gear runs a little small and I'd probably want to try it on anyway. Why? Because shopping is irritating.


Underwear

I call this "Underwear" even though most of it covers enough to wear out in the open. Anything you wear under your suit should be either fireproof or non-flammable: no metal latches, no synthetic materials, and nothing that could otherwise burn onto your skin if it gets hot. If you're wearing a single-layer SFI 3.2/A1 or SFI 3.2/A3 suit, you'll want to get underwear that looks like long johns for maximum protection.

Comfortable fireproof t-shirts and shorts mean that you can take your suit off and not worry about running around in your "underwear," so there's also that.

Some underwear items are required even if you've got a multi-layer SFI 3.2/A5 suit and are planning to be Commando Man underneath. You need socks to cover that awkward space between your suit and your shoes, plus you'll need to wear a balaclava if you've got any facial hair or long hair that might stick out from underneath your helmet.


Balaclavas are genuinely awkward looking things, so it's a good thing they're under a helmet. The extra room is always on top, where only silly hipsters and people with sweet mohawks seem to have more hair. If you've got business in the front and a party in the back, however, you'd think that they'd allow more room at the bottom for hair, but noooooo. Consequently, wearing a balaclava will make you look like you're either about to rob a bank or you're Condom Man, but the upside is that it'll prevent your neck from catching on fire since it'd be otherwise exposed.

While I've always felt as if Nomex is soft enough to begin with, Carbon-X is a bit softer, and thus, scratches your plums less (allegedly).


If you're racing in hot weather, your team may want to look into buying a cool shirt system. These come with a cooler you fill full of ice and cold water that circulates through a series of tubes. You can either get a pre-made cool shirt out of nomex or cotton, or sew one together yourself using a t-shirt and the appropriately sized aquarium tubing.

This Means Your Bra, Too (Unfortunately)

So, here's the part where I get to rant about wanting to slap whoever determined that all women fit nicely between a 32-38 band size and a A-DD cup size with both Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Yes, we name ours, too.

Congratulations, if you're outside of that "normal" range, it's always going to be ridiculously pricey for you to find basic underwear, much less fireproof gear. This I hate. I could buy about three timing belt tensioner pulleys for the 944 for the price of a normal bra for me. Hate. Loathe. Despise. Not amused. Not at all.

Here's a primer on how bras work for those of you who are reading this section in wonderment and awe. These are sized a lot like dudes' pants: there are two measurements that determine everything. There's a band size, which is how far around it is around your rib cage, just underneath the boobs. Then there's a cup size, which is determined by the difference in size between the thickest part of your boobs and the band size underneath. One inch of difference is an A, two is a B, and this pattern continues all the way up to the Ds, where depending on the manufacturer, five or more inches is either more Ds (DD = 5, DDD = 6) or continues up the alphabet (E = 5, F= 6, and onwards).

If you're a "boob guy" and you're talking about a really thin woman with huge bazongas, please stop referring to them as "sweet 36Ds." She's probably a 30 or 32 multiple-D of some kind, and if she's wearing a 36 band size with that shallow of a cup, that'd be really, really uncomfortable. /rant.


So, back to the subject not setting your boobs on fire. Underwires turn into hot branding irons if they get hot, so even if your usual bra is all cotton, you'll need to find one that lacks any metal parts, too.

There are a surprising number of options out there for fireproof bras now, just not so much if you're an oddball size. While most look like sports bras, others like this one from PXP Racewear look more like normal bras—just without all the hooks, eyes and underwires. Many of the same manufacturers that do custom sizing on suits often do custom underwear as well. Measure away and start calling around.


Helmets

Here's the one item where measurements don't seem to be as precise as they should be. You can still get a rough idea of whether or not one's going to fit by the measurements posted online for most helmets, but there's no real way to tell if the shape of the helmet is going to fit the shape of your head without trying it on. Different helmets have different shapes, oddly enough.

If you're between sizes, you can often swap the padding out for thicker padding if all of that is removable.

Most groups require helmets that are Snell-rated SA2005 or newer, so you can pick up an older certification or a slightly used one if you're trying to keep costs down as much as possible. Other certifications such as FIA 8860 are often listed, so check with the organization you're running with if you have one of those stickers instead of the Snell one. New helmets often start at around $250 and can reach into multiple thousands of dollars depending on how many extra features you want: lightweight carbon shells, integrated drinks tubes, ventilation systems, head and neck restraint posts, speakers and wires for communications and customized padding.

Because there's a nice rollbar in the way, most racecars don't have the drop-down visor that spares you from squinting anymore. To get around this, you can either buy a pair of sunglasses that you can cram into the visor hole or get a tinted or mirrored visor. Just don't go with a tinted visor if you're planning on racing on conditions too dark to need it. You should leave it down if you're out on track, else there's nothing to protect your face if things go wrong.


Many racers also decorate their helmets with stickers or even paint to make sure they know which helmet is theirs, too. Again, I must reiterate my preference for sparkles.


Head and Neck Restraints

Most people like it when their head doesn't snap off—self included. This is why head and neck restraints are such a big deal.

Foam collars are your cheapest option, and still technically legal for LeMons and ChumpCar. While a lot of people find them less restrictive in movement, they don't actually do very much to keep your head from snapping too far forward in an impact.

Most groups are encouraging people to get a HANS, Necksgen, Hybrid or similar device. These usually snap onto the helmet itself to keep your head from snapping too far, too violently should something happen to your car with you in it. You need to install the corresponding posts into your helmet to do this. If you're nervous about drilling into your own helmet, many newer helmets come with holes for neck restraint posts pre-drilled. Some can even be ordered with the posts themselves pre-installed.

Many devices like the Necksgen REV and HANS look kind of like composite or carbon fiber toilet seats. Slip your neck through the open side and belts that go in top hold the device (and you) firmly in place. Because of this, some harnesses are now made with thinner belts on the top to accommodate HANS devices. If your entire car is using one, you may want to get HANS-specific harnesses, too.

For that reason, racers who do a lot of trackday instruction tend to favor the Hybrid devices. These feature extra straps that hold the device to your body, eliminating the need to be used with a racing harness. This way, if a car only has three-point belts, you can still use the same neck restraint as you do for crapcan racing.


Gloves and Shoes

These are two more items you need to acquire that must be SFI or FIA rated to pass tech in most crapcan series. These are the two parts of your body that are getting the most use while racing, so make sure you find options that are fairly comfortable.

If your steering wheel is fairly slick, gloves with grippy material on the palms and fingers can help keep the wheel exactly where you want it to be without having to keep a death grip on the wheel. (You shouldn't be holding the wheel like that anyway since you can feel more of what's going on with a lighter grip.)

Most racing shoes don't offer a lot in the way of support, which is mostly fine since you'll wear them primarily when sitting to race. Soles are kept thin to help you feel the pedals beneath you. If you're used to running around in FiveFingers (...hi), this probably won't be a big deal. If you're used to wearing heavy-duty padded orthopedic running shoes, you're probably going to want to change out of your racing shoes as soon as you're out of the car.

Unfortunately, this is another set of items that may be difficult to find if you are a strange size. Not many vendors make different widths of shoes or lengths of gloves. In that case, you may want to find a vendor that works with custom sizing on these.


Less Expensive Options

While there's plenty of merit for spending extra on safety gear, it shouldn't be a serious barrier to entry if you really want to go crapcan racing.

One option if you know a lot of people who do this sort of thing would be to ask around and borrow gear. They might get tired of you asking after several races, but if you're just looking to try it out or going to a race that's far from home, this might be worth a shot.

Another option that is great for just trying out the sport is to rent gear. Places like Race Suit Rental will give you a clean set of in-spec gear starting at $180 per event (with a $500 deposit you'll get back if everything gets returned in good shape).

Alternately, you can always find spare or used gear for sale on forums, eBay and other places online. Look for items that are still in spec and in good shape. This is one way to afford a nicer suit, for example, that you probably couldn't afford new.

Or there's the tried and true method of waiting for things to go on sale. Safety gear usually gets updated once a year, so when the old year's inventory needs to move, many vendors put it on sale. Things get discounted even further when a new specification comes out. If you're fine with having to replace your gear a little sooner than you would if you'd bought gear that conforms to the most recent specs, that's a great time to try to find new items at heavily discounted prices.

Some series have partnerships with vendors that allow racers to get gear at lower prices. The 24 Hours of LeMons, for example, puts together a "dirt cheap" package that includes everything you need for $525.

Now that you have all the gear to go racing, you can be super-lazy and go as a racecar driver for Halloween, too! (No, really. Don't do that unless you're totally out of ideas.)
Now this talks about racing but use this knowledge and apply it towards any racetrack you will be on for your own safety. Do I use all of this stuff? No, but some of it is on my short list.

T.
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The drag strip is like sniffing glue, it's cheap, it's a decent buzz, it doesn't last long and they are all the same.
Road racing is like China White Heroin, the buzz is stronger, the high lasts for hours, it's extremely addictive and they are all different.
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:09 AM   #31
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Use a torque wrench on the lugs (wheel nuts) before each event - especially if you had your wheels off. I know a couple of people that have lost wheels during a race. (not Camaros) One car's wheel studs failed after "re torquing" their lugs the night before without a torque wrench and the damage was significant.

Bring towels if there is a chance of rain.
What should we be torquing the lug nuts at for track duty? I have Forgestar F14's.
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:17 AM   #32
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Quote:
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What should we be torquing the lug nuts at for track duty? I have Forgestar F14's.
OEM specs, it is the lug/stud that dictates the torque, so you are not stretching the stud, or making it to loose
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:40 AM   #33
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What should we be torquing the lug nuts at for track duty? I have Forgestar F14's.
Would have to check with Forgestar and wheel nut mfr.

If stock parts:
Depends on the year, etc. I use the stock specs listed in the owners manual. (Technical Data Section)

Note - Specs changed sometime in 2012.
Wheel nuts with blue tint cone seats 150Y 110 lb ft
Wheel nuts with silver tint cone seats 190Y 140 lb ft

Years before then 140#
Years after then 110# into 2013
Have no idea after 2013 (may change again mid 2014, 2015, who knows)

These are examples for illustration purposes only. You must check the manual that came with your car.
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Old 03-31-2014, 01:42 PM   #34
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Nice write up T-Bone. I've got to drive with T-Bone at 2 events. Very knowledeable guy and very helpful on and off the track. Subscribed !
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Old 03-31-2014, 07:34 PM   #35
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Nice write up T-Bone. I've got to drive with T-Bone at 2 events. Very knowledeable guy and very helpful on and off the track. Subscribed !
T-Bone and TLSTWIN have been really helpfull at a couple events for me too! Zeus, I think you're the one who loaned me your Go-Pro at Gingerman! These track days are full of a bunch of guys who are truly enthusiastic and love to help other guys, especially novice drivers like me! Thanks guys and great thread T!
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Old 03-31-2014, 11:34 PM   #36
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Great write up!
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Old 04-05-2014, 01:58 PM   #37
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Here's a list of items I take to the track. I bought some plastic totes with clamp on lids to keep things organized.

1. air pressure gage
2. Torque wrench (good idea to check torque after getting things heated up)
3. Lightweight floor jack (harbor freight aluminum works good)
4. Glass cleaner
5. Blue painters tape (good for adding numbers)
6. Folding lawn chair
7. Small cooler with lots of bottled water and snacks/lunch.
8. Portable air tank if your track does not have air.
Adding my thoughts too.
9. small wrench for the brake bleeder valve. These will leak if you heat them up. It's nice to have one to tighten them back down.
10. Depending on track rules. i bring a allen wrench to take off the huge rear view mirror.
11. Paper towels or shop rags.
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Old 04-05-2014, 08:35 PM   #38
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Why do you take off the mirror? I wish i had a mirror along the whole top of windshield on track.
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:50 PM   #39
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Why do you take off the mirror? I wish i had a mirror along the whole top of windshield on track.
For HPDE days you can only pass on the straights. The track I go to always has a instructor in each car.

I take the mirror off because it block so much of the front view looking into the corners. I'm sure if it was the smaller no frame mirror it would be different.
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Old 04-07-2014, 05:54 PM   #40
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I HAD to post this video up. It is Mike Musto from /Drive and he is modifying a Mustang but it is still relevant as that car is a Muscle Car too.

Please take notes at the 2:35ish mark when David Ray from Hooked on Driving mentions modifying your car. Notice the FIRST thing he mentions. Yea BEBE!!!

BRAKES! BRAKES! BRAKES!



When the car is in the shop the rear end is moot but the front is similar to our cars. Also notice the brakes, slotted not drilled.

I absolutely LOVE Mike's enthusiasm when he get's the car back on track after the car is modified. You can tell how much of a difference it makes. Also notice all they did was suspension and NO HORSEPOWER and they are faster.

"Horsepower is something that looks great in a Magazine article, but suspension is what actually gets you around the track fast." Jack Olsen

T.
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"Horsepower is something that looks great in a Magazine article, but suspension is what actually gets you around the track fast.." Jack Olsen
The drag strip is like sniffing glue, it's cheap, it's a decent buzz, it doesn't last long and they are all the same.
Road racing is like China White Heroin, the buzz is stronger, the high lasts for hours, it's extremely addictive and they are all different.
I can't wait for my next
Track fix.
DA HAWKS used to OWN DA CUP!!!!!
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:13 PM   #41
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good thread guys. i torque to 110 for everything. i re-torque in the mornings before the first session every track day. ive seen guys stretch their studs trying to always torque all the time. if you torqued them when you put the track wheels on and you torque them before the first session each day, you should be good. try to not wrench on em right after you come off track.
i never take off my mirror.
my year this year is all about seat time. ive got all my safety stuff and good brakes, now im just going to focus on learning how to really drive. i did away with all the nannies. i have no traction control, stability control or ABS. it is surprising how much these modern cars drive themselves. i used to run in stabilitrak mode and thought the car was only catching me once in a while. wrong. the difference is huge.
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Old 04-08-2014, 08:31 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by TBone View Post
I HAD to post this video up. It is Mike Musto from /Drive and he is modifying a Mustang but it is still relevant as that car is a Muscle Car too.

Please take notes at the 2:35ish mark when David Ray from Hooked on Driving mentions modifying your car. Notice the FIRST thing he mentions. Yea BEBE!!!

BRAKES! BRAKES! BRAKES!

T.
For anything past a tentative introductory session I don't think that can be overstated. If you've never experienced brake fade (due to either pads overheating/gassing or fluid boiling) you can't imagine how much more comfortable it is to know that your brakes are going to be there for you every single time you step on that pedal.

But . . . when you're initially bedding in track pads - which you probably won't be able to fully accomplish on the street - you may well find yourself in a "green fade" situation in their first or maybe second track session, where you'll find yourself with good pedal height and hard pedal feel but needing to use a whole lot more pedal force to get yourself slowed for the upcoming turn. Take an easy lap (pointing everybody by), pit in, and let them cool, maybe drive around slowly a little after exiting the track if this is possible. DO NOT SET THE P-BRAKE WHEN YOU STOP IN YOUR PIT, and consider moving the car a couple of feet after a minute or two to allow the portions of the rotors under the pads to catch up with the cooling off process.


If you ever get the chance to drive the new C7 Stingray on track - they're partnered with the Hooked On Driving folks at least for this year - take it, and do what it takes to fit it into your class, grid and track session schedule. I don't know if they're running that car with OE pads or with track pads, but either way it'll be an eye-opening experience for what brakes can be like. "Amazing" is a huge understatement stepping from a Mustang (even with track pads and DOT4 fluid) into that car for just a single hot lap.


To that video, it's a shame they didn't spend more time under the front suspension, where there is greater similarity between the Mustang and the Camaro. Cortex is one of the up-and-coming names in the Mustang suspension aftermarket, and we're slowly getting a better handle on why it seems to work as well as comments like in the video indicate. Time (and maybe the S550) will tell if Filip ever gets involved with Camaros.


Norm
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Old 04-08-2014, 09:50 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by ssmike View Post
T-Bone and TLSTWIN have been really helpfull at a couple events for me too! Zeus, I think you're the one who loaned me your Go-Pro at Gingerman! These track days are full of a bunch of guys who are truly enthusiastic and love to help other guys, especially novice drivers like me! Thanks guys and great thread T!
Yep, that was me SSMIKE, I agree these 2 guys are great at helping us Nobs out (at least this NOB). We do appreciate all the advise and tips ! Hopefully we will all meet up at Gingerman again this year.
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Old 04-11-2014, 12:40 AM   #44
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modifications: http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=332717
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:52 PM   #45
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Does anyone have knowledge of HANS (or other brands) type safety devices? After several months and doctors visits I am learning about my neck problems. I want to continue to do AutoX and HPDE events, but I also want to protect my neck the best I can to minimize further damage. I have been using here and google to learn what I can, but I also want to turn to people with knowledge who can point me in the right direction.
Thanks
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Old 04-14-2014, 07:18 PM   #46
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See if you can find anything at Circle Track's website - I know I've seen articles in the print magazines.


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Old 04-15-2014, 11:17 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by RLHMARINES View Post
These videos by Jeff Bucknam are helpful also for HPDE.

Jeff's Tips on Proper Seat Adjustments for the Track
http://youtu.be/QhwZIob1Qkg
The item Jeff mentions in this video (but can't come up with the name) is Angel Pads by Angelwings Tech. They will hold your hips in place so you can use the steering wheel to point the car, not as a device to help you keep your butt in your seat.
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Old 05-14-2014, 01:28 PM   #48
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Bump.

T.
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"Horsepower is something that looks great in a Magazine article, but suspension is what actually gets you around the track fast.." Jack Olsen
The drag strip is like sniffing glue, it's cheap, it's a decent buzz, it doesn't last long and they are all the same.
Road racing is like China White Heroin, the buzz is stronger, the high lasts for hours, it's extremely addictive and they are all different.
I can't wait for my next
Track fix.
DA HAWKS used to OWN DA CUP!!!!!
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Old 05-14-2014, 02:40 PM   #49
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Overall HPDE is a total blast. Some of my takeaways below (stock SS). It was my second time on the track and first at Texas World Speedway. I started in the Green group and moved to Blue for the last session. Comments:

Brakes. I upgraded to stainless steel brake lines and DOT4 prior. No issues with fluid. HOWEVER, the stock pads developed a glaze I think in the third session. I thought I would hit the guy parked in front of me as I pulled up to stage for the next one. So we took the warmup lap conservatively with some brake testing and the glaze burned off, brakes fine. The stock pads wore quickly; I could probably have worn them to the wear indicators if I pushed harder. Not the right choice for more than 1 HPDE.

Wheels. I torqued my stock SS wheels to 150 Nm the night before. I checked them at the end of the first day and they were all loose. I had a little vibration braking from 120mph at the straight.

Tires. The stock Pirellis are just fine unless you have to be the fastest. 1LEs will own you however. It turns out the 1LE Goodyears and the SS Pirelli's have the same wear rating (250), so it may be just width and aspect ratio, though I gotta think the compound is softer when warm. After 2 track days the Pirelli's wore some for sure, but they are still fine for daily driving with 21K miles on them.

Stock SS suspension. You can have plenty of fun with the FE4 suspension. I was getting held back by Lotus' and Boss Mustangs, though barely. With the nannies on, you can just keep your foot down through the curves in the beginning as you learn the line. However the body roll is annoying and limiting as you go faster. I put a 1LE bar after the track days on the rear and this is probably all it needed to counter most of it, although I am predicting the car will break free with less notice. I have the front bar on order. I am thinking cradle bushings and rear toe links would help as well.

Stock SS gearing. The 3.45 held me back relative to the SRT8 Challengers and Boss Mustangs if a significant straight occurred between corners. This track was 3rd gear with one shift to 4th on the straight. I would be at 6000rpm at ~100mph in 3rd on the back straight before hitting the brakes. I could only just touch 120mph on the front straight in forth at 4500 rpm (roughly). The 3.91 I am predicting would get me to 125-130. Otherwise CAI and/or headers would likely provide a similar boost given the rpms.

1LE oil separator. A must I think. No oil consumption over the 2 days.

"Its not a race." So true. There were a couple of show offs that ended up going off the track or otherwise pushing the car more than they or it could handle. I would line up with a lot of cars between us to avoid being near them. Other guys were clearly in control but still very fast. Remember insurance will likely only cover you once, if at all. Focus on learning the line.

Oil temps. I was at the third tick mark after each session, though pressure seemed same as when at 210. Used Pennzoil Ultra Euro 5w-30. Air temps were around 80-90 deg.

I am now going to get another set of wheels/tires. Track brakes pads for sure. This along with the front/rear 1LE stabilizer bars should fix the things that annoyed me on the track. If I get picky it will be cradle bushing, rear toe links, and gears. Then better seat belts, headers, CAI, R compound tires, better brake discs, .....

Last edited by wakespeak; 05-14-2014 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 05-16-2014, 06:31 PM   #50
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This is a great thread. Well done T.
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