Camaro5 Chevy Camaro Forum / Camaro ZL1, SS and V6 Forums - Camaro5.com
 
Gen5DIY
Go Back   Camaro5 Chevy Camaro Forum / Camaro ZL1, SS and V6 Forums - Camaro5.com > Members Area > Off-topic Discussions

Off-topic Discussions Discuss any off-topic subjects with other members.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-04-2010, 03:29 PM   #1
Brokinarrow


 
Brokinarrow's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 Honda NC700x
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Indianola, IA
Posts: 5,341
Plasma rocket = 40 day trip to Mars

Just caught this article on MSNBC, and ooooh my god I am geekin out over it now!!!
Quote:
An innovative plasma rocket being built as a spare for one heading to the International Space Station may have a space mission of its own: visiting an asteroid.

Equipped with an electric propulsion system, the rocket, known as Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), is being developed to one day transport astronauts to Mars in 39 to 45 days — a fraction of the six to nine months the trip would take with conventional chemical rockets. Shorter travel time greatly reduces astronauts' exposure to potentially deadly cosmic and solar radiation, currently a show-stopper for human missions to Mars.

Setting sail for an asteroid would be a powerful demonstration of VASIMR technology, which uses radio waves to ionize propellant — such as argon, xenon or hydrogen — and heat the resulting plasma to temperatures 20 times hotter than the surface of the sun. In place of metal nozzles to control the direction of the exhaust, VASIMR uses magnetic fields.
"All of a sudden, the future is here," said VASIMR inventor and physicist Franklin Chang-Diaz, a seven-time shuttle flier who left NASA in 2005 to start a company and work full time developing the rocket.

Chang Diaz's Houston-based Ad Astra Rocket Co., which has raised millions of dollars from private investors, reached a significant milestone last year when it successfully operated a demonstrator VASIMR at full power in a vacuum chamber.

"The engine is actually firing right now," Chang-Diaz told Discovery News. "We have lots of hurdles and challenges; we have lots of work to do. But if you look at what has happened in the last five years since we left NASA, it's been amazing."

Ad Astra plans to launch its flight version VASIMR to the space station in 2014. As a backup, Chang-Diaz intends to manufacture two engines in case a launch accident or other major problem prevents the first from reaching the outpost.


Once the engine is safely installed outside the station, the spare could be tapped for a new mission — that did not require investment by NASA.

"I had this idea that maybe there's a way we can use this backup engine that he's already building," said Rob Kelso, a former shuttle flight director at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston now working to build innovative partnerships between NASA and commercial firms.

While the space station's VASIMR can draw power from the outpost, a free-flying engine will need its own source. As part of the proposed asteroid mission, NASA and Ad Astra would team with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to use its super-efficient, 200-kilowatt solar array currently under development.

Once the rocket reached its target asteroid, the power would be available to operate science equipment and other gear.

"You could do an extraordinary mission," Chang-Diaz said. "You don't need the power system for the rocket. Once you're there, you turn off the engine and you have 200 kilowatts to do anything you want to do. You can do all kinds of unheard of things with that level of power."

In addition to radar mapping and surveys, the mission also could pick up a sample from the asteroid and return it to Earth. Scientists are interested in learning more about where asteroids came from, how they formed and whether they carry the ingredients for life. On a practical level, learning how asteroids are structured would be useful in case one is discovered to be on a collision course with Earth and needs to be moved.
The mission also fits with the new direction President Barack Obama has outlined for NASA. Obama wants to cancel the return-to-the-moon program NASA had been developing and instead spend money on producing and testing new technologies for deep space exploration. During a speech at Kennedy Space Center earlier this month, Obama specifically called for a human mission to an asteroid by 2025.

The VASIMR asteroid mission is among several proposals currently being assessed by a NASA study team. If selected, the mission could fly somewhere around 2017, Kelso said.
This seriously has huge potential to revolutionize space travel! Or at the very least, they can start putting these things on satellites and the costs of keeping them in orbit will drop dramatically! Cheaper satellite TV people!!!!


Seriously though, I can't get my imagination to quit thinking about all the possible way this can be used....

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36942268...science-space/
__________________

Last edited by Brokinarrow; 05-17-2010 at 05:35 PM. Reason: clarifying title
Brokinarrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2010, 05:26 PM   #2
CamaroSpike23
Mr. Nitpicky
 
CamaroSpike23's Avatar
 
Drives: anything I can get my hands on
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: anywhere and everywhere
Posts: 22,930
Send a message via Yahoo to CamaroSpike23
whoa... to say the least
__________________
Never race anything you can't afford to light on fire and push off a cliff
Quote:
Originally Posted by BowtieGuy View Post
Nobody makes CamaroSpike happy. You just disgust him a little less than other people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogwinters View Post
Read that link that Spike posted, it'll tell you everything you need to know.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WheelmanSS View Post
Post count is truly an accurate measure of how cool someone is on the Internet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Norris View Post
I piss excellence
and fart awesomeness
Quote:
Originally Posted by BowtieGuy View Post
Nobody makes CamaroSpike happy. You just disgust him a little less than other people.
"You can think I'm wrong, but that's no reason to quit thinking.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overflow View Post
But not all people were born awesome like you, Spike.
CamaroSpike23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2010, 05:32 PM   #3
Kyle2k
LVL 50 Troll Stomper
 
Kyle2k's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Camaro
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Grand Forks, ND
Posts: 3,244
Holy crap, I read this post when you initially posted it, but wow no one replied...this is huge stuff guys...the Camaro could well be in space by the time we die haha!
__________________
Kyle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2010, 05:34 PM   #4
2010 SSRS



 
2010 SSRS's Avatar
 
Drives: 3 V8 Camaros
Join Date: May 2009
Location: The Ocean State
Posts: 123,973
wow
__________________
Jannetty Racing JRE Street Package
2010 SSRS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2010, 05:47 PM   #5
Brokinarrow


 
Brokinarrow's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 Honda NC700x
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Indianola, IA
Posts: 5,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle2k View Post
Holy crap, I read this post when you initially posted it, but wow no one replied...this is huge stuff guys...the Camaro could well be in space by the time we die haha!
I mean, to think, these engines are capable of these speeds on their 1st generation!! Imagine the 2nd gen after some refinements and boosts in power - cut the travel time to Mars to 7 days!! And you know what isn't too far away from Mars? Asteroid belt! Helllooooo mining operations! I know what my first target would be: Eros http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/sci/tech/401227.stm
__________________
Brokinarrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2010, 07:34 PM   #6
DGthe3
Moderator.ca
 
DGthe3's Avatar
 
Drives: 05 Grand Am GT
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Niagara, Canada
Posts: 22,196
Send a message via MSN to DGthe3
Another application could be deflection of killer asteroids. I think there is one that is known to have a small chance of hitting us within a couple decades (vs a minuscule chance of hitting us within a century). I sat fly out, land, and shift its trajectory by half a degree so that it can't hit the Earth. Unless we want to send Bruce Willis, a bunch of roughnecks, and a nuke instead ...
__________________
Note, if I've gotten any facts wrong in the above, just ignore any points I made with them
__________________
don't believe a thing you read about the next gen Camaro -- as history has proven time and time again:

WE DO NOT TALK ABOUT FUTURE PRODUCT PLANS PERIOD FbodFather
__________________

Camaro5 Fest sub-forum
DGthe3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 10:55 AM   #7
2001ragtop

 
2001ragtop's Avatar
 
Drives: V8 american car
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Tx
Posts: 1,419
I hope the private sector uses the new rocket to fly to the moon and back just for practice runs.
2001ragtop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 01:18 PM   #8
Big Brunsy


 
Big Brunsy's Avatar
 
Drives: Silverado
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Le Mars, Iowa
Posts: 2,291
The aliens are gonna come shut the program down....can't have us earthlings wandering around out in space....we might actually find something.
__________________
Big Brunsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 02:04 PM   #9
Brokinarrow


 
Brokinarrow's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 Honda NC700x
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Indianola, IA
Posts: 5,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGthe3 View Post
Another application could be deflection of killer asteroids. I think there is one that is known to have a small chance of hitting us within a couple decades (vs a minuscule chance of hitting us within a century). I sat fly out, land, and shift its trajectory by half a degree so that it can't hit the Earth. Unless we want to send Bruce Willis, a bunch of roughnecks, and a nuke instead ...
Or shift it just enough to put in a stable orbit and mine that puppy! If there's anything useful on it anyway...
__________________
Brokinarrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 02:16 PM   #10
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: Blown beast.
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,916
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2001ragtop View Post
I hope the private sector uses the new rocket to fly to the moon and back just for practice runs.


And beyond.
__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 02:32 PM   #11
2001ragtop

 
2001ragtop's Avatar
 
Drives: V8 american car
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Tx
Posts: 1,419
you never know

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Brunsy View Post
The aliens are gonna come shut the program down....can't have us earthlings wandering around out in space....we might actually find something.
astronaut edgar mitchell would probably agree with that.

it wouldn't surprise me if we are quarantined here and can't leave. it would explain a lot.
2001ragtop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 10:57 AM   #12
5thGenOwner

 
Drives: 20TEN SS/RS L99 (SIM)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,928
"...Franklin Chang-Diaz, a seven-time shuttle flier who left NASA in 2005 to start a company and work full time developing the rocket."

Doesn't anyone else find that interesting? He left NASA to develop a rocket. Further evidence that the private sector is the way FORWARD!


Quote:
Originally Posted by 2001ragtop View Post
I hope the private sector uses the new rocket to fly to the moon and back just for practice runs.
__________________
5thGenOwner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 11:01 AM   #13
ron10


 
Drives: 2010 2SS IOM L99
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: LOUISVILLE,KY..
Posts: 7,403
wonder what that baby will do in the 1/4.
ron10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 02:43 PM   #14
PQ
Booooosted.
 
PQ's Avatar
 
Drives: Blown beast.
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 36,916
Send a message via Yahoo to PQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thGenOwner View Post
"...Franklin Chang-Diaz, a seven-time shuttle flier who left NASA in 2005 to start a company and work full time developing the rocket."

Doesn't anyone else find that interesting? He left NASA to develop a rocket. Further evidence that the private sector is the way FORWARD!




__________________
PQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 03:26 PM   #15
Kyle2k
LVL 50 Troll Stomper
 
Kyle2k's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 Camaro
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Grand Forks, ND
Posts: 3,244
While I understand the higher level of efficiency and innovation the private sector provides, I have no real faith in it to get things done when no or only a small profit margin is present.
__________________
Kyle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 05:07 PM   #16
Brokinarrow


 
Brokinarrow's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 Honda NC700x
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Indianola, IA
Posts: 5,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle2k View Post
While I understand the higher level of efficiency and innovation the private sector provides, I have no real faith in it to get things done when no or only a small profit margin is present.
Hence the mining operations on asteroids/ the moon. That wasn't a joke There definitely IS some real money to be made by harvesting precious minerals and metals off of those things. I agree with you though, if there isn't enough money in it the private sector won't thrive. Which is exactly why we need to find a significantly cheaper way to get IN to space.
__________________
Brokinarrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 08:41 PM   #17
DGthe3
Moderator.ca
 
DGthe3's Avatar
 
Drives: 05 Grand Am GT
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Niagara, Canada
Posts: 22,196
Send a message via MSN to DGthe3
Hate to break it to you guys but space mining is a distant dream. Lets say an operation could bring back 5 tons of pure gold (the largest mine in the world only produces about 60 tons a year). That would be worth a little less than $200M today. That is a very large payload and would be exceedingly difficult to actually produce. But lets assume it is possible for a space mine. Thing is, mining equipment breaks. That means mechanics and technicians need to be on site, with replacement parts. And if you send a mining crew, you will also need people to support them (such as a doctor for when people 'break'). All these people need to be fed and watered for several months. The weight of the stuff required to keep people living that long in a hostile environment with no resupply will be huge, and that is on top of the weight of the spacecraft and mining equipment. It wouldn't be possible to return a shipment for more money than it cost to send the spacecraft, crew, and equipment up in the first place, let alone paying for all the stuff to be made or the crew to be paid. And what if it blows up on the launch pad or crashes into the asteroid or breaks up upon re-entry? All that money gets wasted.

Launch costs need to go down, precious metals need to go up, and spaceflight needs to become safer before the possibility of space mining becomes realistic. In the meantime, lets setup lunar and martian research stations and learn how to live beyond the Earth. Besides, by the time mining asteroids becomes viable, it will probably be more economical to mine municipal garbage dumps and tailing pits from old mines.
__________________
Note, if I've gotten any facts wrong in the above, just ignore any points I made with them
__________________
don't believe a thing you read about the next gen Camaro -- as history has proven time and time again:

WE DO NOT TALK ABOUT FUTURE PRODUCT PLANS PERIOD FbodFather
__________________

Camaro5 Fest sub-forum
DGthe3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2010, 09:47 PM   #18
RJBJFIRE
IAFF Local 11
 
RJBJFIRE's Avatar
 
Drives: 2010 HPE 550 Camaro 2SS RS, 1969 SS
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Posts: 111
Works for me... Wish I could come up with this tech...
RJBJFIRE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2010, 03:19 AM   #19
AlSuwaidi


 
AlSuwaidi's Avatar
 
Drives: BLACK LS3 GCC-Spec
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: UAE - SHARJAH
Posts: 2,878
nie read!!
AlSuwaidi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2010, 01:38 PM   #20
2001ragtop

 
2001ragtop's Avatar
 
Drives: V8 american car
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Tx
Posts: 1,419
Moon movie

Quote:
Originally Posted by DGthe3 View Post
....Hate to break it to you guys but space mining is a distant dream.....
There is a movie that came out in theaters in 2009 called "Moon" starring Sam Rockwell.

In this movie, he's an astronaut stationed on the moon. he is alone, and robots are mining the moon for Helium-3. The story is based in the "not so distant" future.

The way he sends back what was mined on the moon, is he sends back a payload inside something that looks like a torpedo, back towards earth. (like a small rocket with a payload).

From this perspective, I think mining is possible. In the movie, they do make it look like it is not that easy to travel to the moon, though they can do it. Which is one reason I believe he is stationed there alone.
This was a great movie. It is a mystery type movie. I would recommend to anyone who likes science fiction. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1182345/

Lastly: Advanced Technology falls into our hands on a daily basis. We will be out in space soon enough.

Last edited by 2001ragtop; 05-20-2010 at 01:51 PM.
2001ragtop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2010, 11:22 PM   #21
Brokinarrow


 
Brokinarrow's Avatar
 
Drives: 2012 Honda NC700x
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Indianola, IA
Posts: 5,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGthe3 View Post
Hate to break it to you guys but space mining is a distant dream. Lets say an operation could bring back 5 tons of pure gold (the largest mine in the world only produces about 60 tons a year). That would be worth a little less than $200M today. That is a very large payload and would be exceedingly difficult to actually produce. But lets assume it is possible for a space mine. Thing is, mining equipment breaks. That means mechanics and technicians need to be on site, with replacement parts. And if you send a mining crew, you will also need people to support them (such as a doctor for when people 'break'). All these people need to be fed and watered for several months. The weight of the stuff required to keep people living that long in a hostile environment with no resupply will be huge, and that is on top of the weight of the spacecraft and mining equipment. It wouldn't be possible to return a shipment for more money than it cost to send the spacecraft, crew, and equipment up in the first place, let alone paying for all the stuff to be made or the crew to be paid. And what if it blows up on the launch pad or crashes into the asteroid or breaks up upon re-entry? All that money gets wasted.

Launch costs need to go down, precious metals need to go up, and spaceflight needs to become safer before the possibility of space mining becomes realistic. In the meantime, lets setup lunar and martian research stations and learn how to live beyond the Earth. Besides, by the time mining asteroids becomes viable, it will probably be more economical to mine municipal garbage dumps and tailing pits from old mines.

That's the big one, if we can get launch costs down to a very minimal level space travel will explode. You make valid points, but I will still dream of it Another thing we need to look into is a controlled descent so we don't have to worry as much about large weighty heat shields on our craft. Of course for a quick and easy option, the ships could remain in space and drop the cargo pods for reentry. Then the ship drops by a space station and picks up more cargo pods and heads back to it.
__________________
Brokinarrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2010, 11:29 PM   #22
Buelligun
 
Buelligun's Avatar
 
Drives: 2SSRS manual yellow black stripes
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Medicine Hat, Canada
Posts: 216
Hadn't man better go to the moon first?
Buelligun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 09:13 PM   #23
8cd03gro


 
Drives: 2005 STi corn fed
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,007
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGthe3 View Post
Hate to break it to you guys but space mining is a distant dream. Lets say an operation could bring back 5 tons of pure gold (the largest mine in the world only produces about 60 tons a year). That would be worth a little less than $200M today. That is a very large payload and would be exceedingly difficult to actually produce. But lets assume it is possible for a space mine. Thing is, mining equipment breaks. That means mechanics and technicians need to be on site, with replacement parts. And if you send a mining crew, you will also need people to support them (such as a doctor for when people 'break'). All these people need to be fed and watered for several months. The weight of the stuff required to keep people living that long in a hostile environment with no resupply will be huge, and that is on top of the weight of the spacecraft and mining equipment. It wouldn't be possible to return a shipment for more money than it cost to send the spacecraft, crew, and equipment up in the first place, let alone paying for all the stuff to be made or the crew to be paid. And what if it blows up on the launch pad or crashes into the asteroid or breaks up upon re-entry? All that money gets wasted.

Launch costs need to go down, precious metals need to go up, and spaceflight needs to become safer before the possibility of space mining becomes realistic. In the meantime, lets setup lunar and martian research stations and learn how to live beyond the Earth. Besides, by the time mining asteroids becomes viable, it will probably be more economical to mine municipal garbage dumps and tailing pits from old mines.
Agreed, on everything, but gold would be one of the least mined material on most asteroids. Rhodium, platinum and others would be much more profitable. Anyway, mining isn't really logical and that's neither here nor there. We need to research terraforming, null-g experiments, etc. Because the general public isn't interested in, and frankly doesn't understand the importance of, the developments that could be made, inter-planetary travel doesn't get the attention it should. It's sad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brokinarrow View Post
That's the big one, if we can get launch costs down to a very minimal level space travel will explode. You make valid points, but I will still dream of it Another thing we need to look into is a controlled descent so we don't have to worry as much about large weighty heat shields on our craft. Of course for a quick and easy option, the ships could remain in space and drop the cargo pods for reentry. Then the ship drops by a space station and picks up more cargo pods and heads back to it.
We need the carbon elevator. Time to invest in Zoltek
8cd03gro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2010, 05:41 PM   #24
Big Brunsy


 
Big Brunsy's Avatar
 
Drives: Silverado
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Le Mars, Iowa
Posts: 2,291
I would assume if....I mean WHEN we have space ships capeable of traveling our galaxy we would have a space port where our ships are built, and docked. then you wouldn't need the excessive propultion to break Earth's gravity. Then they would have smaller lander ships to visit other planets.

We just need to find us some Eezo
__________________
Big Brunsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2010, 07:31 AM   #25
dmiller66
Tampa Gulf Coast Family
 
dmiller66's Avatar
 
Drives: '13 2SS/RS, Blue Ray Metallic, Auto
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Plantation, FL
Posts: 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buelligun View Post
Hadn't man better go to the moon first?

Haha...my thoughts exactly. We could also use this new rocket technology to fend off attacking zombies!
dmiller66 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pedders December Dollar Days for the 2010 Camaro and Brand X Vehicles JusticePete Wheels and Tires Talk Sponsored by The Tire Rack 85 07-26-2009 06:20 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.