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-   -   Tom Henry Racing THR22 2010/LS3/IBM/Supercharged SS Camaro [COTW 10/29/12] (https://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24276)

mlee 03-20-2011 08:56 PM

:popcorn:

PQ 03-20-2011 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisterCamaro69 (Post 2987222)
Sure has been quiet in here today. I'm guessing he's driving a bit, gettiing out laughing, admiring the new look, getting in, repeat :laugh:

Or appeasing the better half....... :bellyroll: Car time doesn't come free... lol

Quote:

Originally Posted by 600hp-lpe (Post 2987793)
I almost finished my rollcage cleanup/ whole interior rebuild before GTA installed his alignment LOL...

:laugh:

600hp-lpe 03-21-2011 10:47 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Chris.. might be trapped like this..
maybe that's why we havn't heard from him.
Or he likes the ride so much, he won't get out of the car to tell us.

We need an update!! Don't hold out like Speedster...

PQ 03-21-2011 10:54 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 218913

JusticePete 03-21-2011 10:57 AM

Chris is under a lot of pressure -- about 2 tons worth.

http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...1&d=1300718808

:laughabove:

No joy on the alignment as the shop could not get his THR on the rack. Hopefully today they get it on the rack and his BUSHES TIMED!

PQ 03-21-2011 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JusticePete (Post 2989566)
No joy on the alignment as the shop could not get his THR on the rack. Hopefully today they get it on the rack and his BUSHES TIMED!

Bushes timed... ?

zebra 03-21-2011 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JusticePete (Post 2986567)
it is all about approach angles. Of course it is my business but I lower every thing and drive every where. If you don't rub some time you need to go lower.

oh, try going from 4x4s almost all your life to a leveled corvette :rolleyes:
i learned about approach angles & speed real quick! :yikes:

i almost cried a few weeks ago when i went to warsh her & accidentally found out about the retaining mounds you have to drive over. that was one of the most heart-wrenching sounds i've experienced in a vehicle! :( and that was at a slow angle! :facepalm:

Quote:

Originally Posted by JusticePete (Post 2989566)
Chris is under a lot of pressure -- about 2 tons worth.

http://www.camaro5.com/forums/attach...1&d=1300718808

:laughabove:

No joy on the alignment as the shop could not get his THR on the rack. Hopefully today they get it on the rack and his BUSHES TIMED!

:laugh: i bet it was as fun as putting Randy's car on the trailer :rolleyes:

Quote:

Originally Posted by PQ (Post 2989587)
Bushes timed... ?

:word:

JusticePete 03-21-2011 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PQ (Post 2989587)
Bushes timed... ?

We sync them to the Atomic clock for optimal function in relation to the earth's magnetic fields.

http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135483

While some lower their cars just for the look, many lower their cars for improved function. To get the full benefit of lowering coils, you need an alignment tech that understands performance vehicles and lowered vehicles.

The first step in proper alignment on a lowered car is to break loose the bolts at every rotational suspension bolt. That would include the the radius and inner control arm bolts up front. In the rear, the trailing arm, toe link, upper and lower control arm at the knuckle and he lower inner. The car then should be at least bounced. The prefered method is driven gently slowly around the ship parking lot. With the weight of the vehicle on the wheels all the bolts are made tight. This process times the bonded ferule OEM rubber bushes to the new ride height.

Timing the bushings balances the car. The rotational resistance in the bushes is a second set of springs in the car. If they are not timed to the new ride height they are creating uneven loads as the car moves over a bump. The suspension will function correctly with the bushes timed and will also last longer. Only a professional that understands suspension will take this extra step or a dedicated DIY like Chris.

zebra 03-21-2011 11:53 AM

:thumbsup:

GTAHVIT 03-21-2011 01:14 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Damn! sorry. yesterday was family day... :D had to run around with the wife an kiddos. but here are some images for you guys to check out. I've got some good video but didn't take any pics of the install... :facepalm:


So, the car is pulling to the right obviously the alignment will fix that.... it's not pulling much but just enough keep me from any spirited driving... I will say this... out of the box with zero tweaking... there is a night an day difference. the car is now flat... stays flat and unless God wills it, it will never not be flat... :laugh:

I know i have much more "feedback" from all four corners I'm sure I'll feel much better after the alignment is done right now the pulling is kinda ruining the overall effect of the new suspension... The responsiveness to any steering input is much more crisp even with the alignment out...

I'll have a much better report for you all tomorrow after the alignment. :headbang:

PICS!!!!

GTAHVIT 03-21-2011 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JusticePete (Post 2989778)
We sync them to the Atomic clock for optimal function in relation to the earth's magnetic fields.

http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135483

While some lower their cars just for the look, many lower their cars for improved function. To get the full benefit of lowering coils, you need an alignment tech that understands performance vehicles and lowered vehicles.

The first step in proper alignment on a lowered car is to break loose the bolts at every rotational suspension bolt. That would include the the radius and inner control arm bolts up front. In the rear, the trailing arm, toe link, upper and lower control arm at the knuckle and he lower inner. The car then should be at least bounced. The prefered method is driven gently slowly around the ship parking lot. With the weight of the vehicle on the wheels all the bolts are made tight. This process times the bonded ferule OEM rubber bushes to the new ride height.

Timing the bushings balances the car. The rotational resistance in the bushes is a second set of springs in the car. If they are not timed to the new ride height they are creating uneven loads as the car moves over a bump. The suspension will function correctly with the bushes timed and will also last longer. Only a professional that understands suspension will take this extra step or a dedicated DIY like Chris.


Should I go ahead and do this tonight before I take it to the delaer for an alignemnt?

Or do you think the dealer will do this... on a camaro/corvette anyway?

600hp-lpe 03-21-2011 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTAHVIT (Post 2990063)
Should I go ahead and do this tonight before I take it to the delaer for an alignemnt?

Or do you think the dealer will do this... on a camaro/corvette anyway?

It's not something they would "normally" do at a dealership as part of an alignment. Unless you know the guy that is doing the work, I would be doing it myself so it gets done.

GTAHVIT 03-21-2011 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 600hp-lpe (Post 2990146)
It's not something they would "normally" do at a dealership as part of an alignment. Unless you know the guy that is doing the work, I would be doing it myself so it gets done.

OK cool I'll do this tonight.

So basically any where there is rotation or pivot, loosen those bolts drive for a bit then jack back up and retighten?

Mr Twisty 03-21-2011 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTAHVIT (Post 2990296)
OK cool I'll do this tonight.

So basically any where there is rotation or pivot, loosen those bolts drive for a bit then jack back up and retighten?

The car looks GOOD!
After you bounce or drive it, you want to tighten all the nuts/bolts without upsetting their new position. You don't want to jack it up. It would be best to do it at the alignment shop, or someplace with a pit.


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