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-   -   TR5 vs TR6 Plugs (https://www.camaro5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585120)

Camaro227 11-27-2020 06:51 AM

TR5 vs TR6 Plugs
 
Hi all,

Should I go with the NGK TR5 Or the TR6?

Stock L99

Thanks

CamaroCracka 11-27-2020 07:07 AM

TR5
If you had forced induction or a big cam, TR6

sixty9fordkiller 11-27-2020 09:26 AM

TR5. You will lose power on a stock car if you go with TR6

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

Camaro227 11-27-2020 09:27 AM

Thank you all for the information! ��

InFiD3ViL 11-27-2020 01:39 PM

With NGK, the lower the plug number, the hotter the plug. Higher the number, the colder.

Per NGK: An unaltered engine will run within the optimum operating range straight from the manufacturer, but if you make modifications such as adding a turbo or supercharger, increasing compression, timing changes, use of alternate fuels, or sustained use of nitrous oxide, these can alter the plug tip temperature, necessitating a colder plug

The OEM Delco plugs on our v8 cars are generally considered to be in the '5' heat range, when compared to NGK. But per NGK themselves, 'The heat range numbering system used by spark plug manufacturers is not universal.'

NGK also says 'A good rule of thumb is, one heat range colder for every 75–100hp added' - of course this isn't a concrete rule, just a rule of thumb as they explain. Datalogs would need to be examined and compared to truly determine if changing to a colder/warmer plug is beneficial and when it's most efficient/safe. But for me, my previous tuner DynoSteve recommended I move to a colder plug, the NGK TR6IX specifically, after I went with headers, catless, CAI, throttle body, and his tune. After I went with a cam, had my heads milled, and a more targeted tune for those mods, my current tuner said I would be perfectly fine to stay with the TR6IX's.

So based on the fact that you are stock and also running the stock tune, you may run into plug fouling issues if unnecessarily running a colder plug, since the plugs likely won't be able to get hot enough with the current stock timing and fueling settings to self clean. This may also lead to inefficient/partial combustion.

Sorry to make this so long, but it figure it is best to also try to explain the 'whys' rather than just tell someone what is best.

NGK has a decent short explanation on their website at this link, which is where this info comes from: https://www.ngk.com/what-is-a-spark-plugs-heat-range-2

1JEWLDSSRS 11-28-2020 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by InFiD3ViL (Post 10909684)
With NGK, the lower the plug number, the hotter the plug. Higher the number, the colder.

Per NGK: An unaltered engine will run within the optimum operating range straight from the manufacturer, but if you make modifications such as adding a turbo or supercharger, increasing compression, timing changes, use of alternate fuels, or sustained use of nitrous oxide, these can alter the plug tip temperature, necessitating a colder plug

The OEM Delco plugs on our v8 cars are generally considered to be in the '5' heat range, when compared to NGK. But per NGK themselves, 'The heat range numbering system used by spark plug manufacturers is not universal.'

NGK also says 'A good rule of thumb is, one heat range colder for every 75100hp added' - of course this isn't a concrete rule, just a rule of thumb as they explain. Datalogs would need to be examined and compared to truly determine if changing to a colder/warmer plug is beneficial and when it's most efficient/safe. But for me, my previous tuner DynoSteve recommended I move to a colder plug, the NGK TR6IX specifically, after I went with headers, catless, CAI, throttle body, and his tune. After I went with a cam, had my heads milled, and a more targeted tune for those mods, my current tuner said I would be perfectly fine to stay with the TR6IX's.

So based on the fact that you are stock and also running the stock tune, you may run into plug fouling issues if unnecessarily running a colder plug, since the plugs likely won't be able to get hot enough with the current stock timing and fueling settings to self clean. This may also lead to inefficient/partial combustion.

Sorry to make this so long, but it figure it is best to also try to explain the 'whys' rather than just tell someone what is best.

NGK has a decent short explanation on their website at this link, which is where this info comes from: https://www.ngk.com/what-is-a-spark-plugs-heat-range-2

Bro I gotta tell ya, you always seem to have some of the MOST awesome info out there for the Camaro community!! And I as well of the others, thank you for your info and desire to share and help. Thanks... :thumbup:

Chris49066SS 11-28-2020 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1JEWLDSSRS (Post 10910037)
Bro I gotta tell ya, you always seem to have some of the MOST awesome info out there for the Camaro community!! And I as well of the others, thank you for your info and desire to share and help. Thanks... :thumbup:

Agreed. He is always super helpful:respekt:

InFiD3ViL 11-28-2020 04:59 PM

Hey thanks fellers. I don't pretend to know everything and am always learning from the smart guys here, but I do like to share what I do know or at the least to try and help someone find an answer.

We gotta do what we can to keep this site alive, and the only way to do it is to keep people feeling that it has value.


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