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Old 10-17-2019, 05:49 PM   #15
Deputy347k9

 
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Originally Posted by George-CZ View Post
Exactly...
I have TPMS for over 10 years and still work.
In the summer, I bought new tires, so I bought a new HUF TPMS with a 10-year battery.

5 years ... This is I listen first time
My guess is battery life parallels quality of the TPMS sensors. You go cheap you end up with cheap.
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Old 10-18-2019, 05:01 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Deputy347k9 View Post
My guess is battery life parallels quality of the TPMS sensors. You go cheap you end up with cheap.

I already understand. So I didn't think about it.
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Old 10-19-2019, 12:52 AM   #17
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Maybe I'm totally wrong about this so please correct me.
I like to have nitrogen in my tires because there isn't moisture in it so there's less chance of corrosion of the sensors and issues stemming from that. I know Costco uses it and probably others. Have you ever used the air gauge in a shop that just uses compresased air and see all the moisture coming out? Can't be good for it.
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Old 10-19-2019, 07:05 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by FasNuf View Post
Maybe I'm totally wrong about this so please correct me.
I like to have nitrogen in my tires because there isn't moisture in it so there's less chance of corrosion of the sensors and issues stemming from that. I know Costco uses it and probably others. Have you ever used the air gauge in a shop that just uses compresased air and see all the moisture coming out? Can't be good for it.
I believe your tires will be long worn out before you would ever notice any form of corrosion in or on your tpms sensors. Steel wheels become effected when the inside wheel coating becomes scratches or damaged.

Nitrogen can be expensive and there are more places that don't offer it than there is that does. If your on the road and you have a tire that goes low and you don't have access to nitrogen then you will have to top the tire off with air. Now that tire needs to be purged at least twice to remove the air and can be costly.

Nitrogen does have some technological advantages over air for tire inflation. Whether or not those advantages will be of any practical use to you depends on how you use your car. Certainly, if you fall into one or more of the categories below, using nitrogen could be beneficial:

If you have one or more cars that are primarily used at the racetrack
If you drive very sparingly and your car sits unused for an extended time
If you own collectible cars that are seldom driven any great distances
If you have to put your car in storage for a significant period of time

If you use your car on a regular basis for daily driving and don’t fall into any of the above categories, it’s difficult to see how using nitrogen gives you any practical benefits, especially compared to its cost and inconvenience.

The estimated life expectancy of an OE TPMS sensor is 5 to 12 years, with the average lifespan being 7 years. TPMS life expectancy is directly related to the number of radio frequency transmissions the sensors make. Driving habits greatly influence the number of RF transmissions a sensor makes in its lifetime. For example: sensors usually transmit when the vehicle is stopped and transmit more often when in motion. Maintaining a constant speed, such as when you're on a highway, reduces the demand on TPMS sensors and allow the sensors to transmit less often. Drivers who often find themselves driving in start-and-stop type traffic will have a greater impact on the vehicles tire pressure monitoring sensors. Weather can also have an impact on tire pressure sensor battery life. Cold conditions allow batteries to last longer. Warmer conditions take more of a toll on TPMS battery life.
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Old 10-19-2019, 07:40 AM   #19
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On my 2010 2SS/RS I was able to reset the sensors myself doing that trick where you push the "SET" Button and then let air out of each tire til it beeps (in proper order) and wa la....


On my 2012 ZL1 the rears are reading backwards and it drove me crazy til I figured it out last week. Kept telling me my DS Rear was low and I kept adding a few lbs and it still showed low. When I finally used a tire pressure gauge I realized the low tire was the PS Rear and the DS Rear was now overfilled (cause I kept believing the computer and kept adding to that side) LOL..


I have one of the hand held iLink 400 tools that suppose to do everything a GM Tech 2 can do, I think I can reset it with that right ?
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