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Old 06-02-2018, 03:24 PM   #29
Kenny Camaro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonman View Post
I'm just glad Kenny is willing to share his results with us. The more I read about these catch cans the less I think I need one.
You should still manually clean your valves! Can or no can! There is a very noticeable performance difference in before and after a cleaning! In acceleration and in gas mileage. Both increase noticeablely!!
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Old 06-04-2018, 10:01 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny Camaro View Post
You should still manually clean your valves! Can or no can! There is a very noticeable performance difference in before and after a cleaning! In acceleration and in gas mileage. Both increase noticeablely!!

Can't argue against that. Reckon I'll have to cull my records and do a graph of my mileage to see what it's doing so far but, just off the top of my head, so far my mileage has only gotten better over the almost 3 years I've owned the car. Started out at about 19MPGs while tap shifting all the time. It got better leaving it in auto sport mode and better still in normal auto, and the last fill up I think it was at or about 22MPGs. I'm not trying to drive it to save gas but I don't get many opportunities to "romp" on it. So there's that.
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Old 06-04-2018, 10:40 PM   #31
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Speaking of the clean side, what exactly is this cylinder thing, and does it have filters or anything that we should be paying attention to?
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Old 06-07-2018, 04:36 PM   #32
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ok people you're all overthinking the catch can thing.



Follow the KISS principle here.


Snake oil, yes mostly.



Let's get back to basics.



First of all how does wet oil cause coking on a valve seated above the combustion chamber?? Coking is a result of combustion gasses, not motor oil.


Secondly these are 4 stroke motors, INTAKE/COMPRESSION/POWER/EXHAUST.


On intake, intake valve is open, sucks in air(fuel is now direct injection). Compression both valves closed, power(controlled explosion), exhaust, exhaust valve is now open.


Now gas burns at a constant rate, no magic pill changes that. Higher octane allows for less pre-detonation(means boom before you want).



Now they've tweaked these a lot over the years, but there's still valve overlap between intake and exhaust cycles. So you've still got some unburned gas that can escape. Yes modern tech it's miniscule but still there. The higher RPMS the more likely you'll see overlap because once again, gas burns at a consistent rate but higher RPMS causes more opening/closing during a minute. So still burning fuel can back into the chamber due to pressures which is what is most likely causing the coking.


Now take those who pump 91+ octane in a motor not tuned for it. Now spark is adjusted with ant-knock readings, temp sensors, cam position sensors etc. But it's estimating the best time to ignite with a 87ish octane. Premium resists ignition and without a stronger spark or adjusted timing like with a tune, you're just adding a little more out of chamber burning, once again at higher RPM's, it's worse when a car isn't properly tuned for it.


So bottom line, it's unlikely to stave off coking. Running an improper octane on a GDI engine isn't good for it. Running higher RPMS more often will increase the chances of escaped gasses.


Now this is just my opinion, i'm no freaking genius, but i've worked on enough motors to see valve overlap and I know these cars are fun to drive and drive fast and hard.



I also know many people think premium fuel in our cars will somehow know that it's a 'slower burning' fuel. It won't, if it did our engines would be flex fuel rated and be setup that way since E85 has much higher octane.


Now tuners, such as overkill, adjust timings to compensate. Your stock ECU.....i doubt it's looking for it or knows how to compensate unless the anti-knock detection is going off but that's 180 from what I believe is causing this coking.


Now the catch can, will keep the motors from ingesting a few ounces of oil which will keep the plugs cleaner over time, giving a better spark and true to life expectancy. Beyond that I can't speak much to how they really do us any good.
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Old 06-09-2018, 01:13 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzzed View Post
Speaking of the clean side, what exactly is this cylinder thing, and does it have filters or anything that we should be paying attention to?
It's completely sealed up. It must be some type of condensation chamber for the oil vapors to settle into before they get routed backed into the air intake. When I installed my Elite clean-side separator, that whole thing gets removed.

I just recently checked my air intake and TB, they were clean as a whistle. I also looked inside my intake from the TB and it to was clean inside. No oil residue to speak of.

I have super low miles, but I do idle it from time to time to keep the battery charged. However, when I do drive it, I'm always getting the revs up to enjoy some of the powerband.

So, I'm not sure why Kenny is getting so much gunk buildup on his intake valves again.
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Old 06-10-2018, 01:52 AM   #34
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Never had that in Aussie FLX
This is inside the Elite clean side separator

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Old 06-10-2018, 03:21 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gossamer View Post
ok people you're all overthinking the catch can thing.



Follow the KISS principle here.


Snake oil, yes mostly.



Let's get back to basics.



First of all how does wet oil cause coking on a valve seated above the combustion chamber?? Coking is a result of combustion gasses, not motor oil.


Secondly these are 4 stroke motors, INTAKE/COMPRESSION/POWER/EXHAUST.


On intake, intake valve is open, sucks in air(fuel is now direct injection). Compression both valves closed, power(controlled explosion), exhaust, exhaust valve is now open.


Now gas burns at a constant rate, no magic pill changes that. Higher octane allows for less pre-detonation(means boom before you want).



Now they've tweaked these a lot over the years, but there's still valve overlap between intake and exhaust cycles. So you've still got some unburned gas that can escape. Yes modern tech it's miniscule but still there. The higher RPMS the more likely you'll see overlap because once again, gas burns at a consistent rate but higher RPMS causes more opening/closing during a minute. So still burning fuel can back into the chamber due to pressures which is what is most likely causing the coking.


Now take those who pump 91+ octane in a motor not tuned for it. Now spark is adjusted with ant-knock readings, temp sensors, cam position sensors etc. But it's estimating the best time to ignite with a 87ish octane. Premium resists ignition and without a stronger spark or adjusted timing like with a tune, you're just adding a little more out of chamber burning, once again at higher RPM's, it's worse when a car isn't properly tuned for it.


So bottom line, it's unlikely to stave off coking. Running an improper octane on a GDI engine isn't good for it. Running higher RPMS more often will increase the chances of escaped gasses.


Now this is just my opinion, i'm no freaking genius, but i've worked on enough motors to see valve overlap and I know these cars are fun to drive and drive fast and hard.



I also know many people think premium fuel in our cars will somehow know that it's a 'slower burning' fuel. It won't, if it did our engines would be flex fuel rated and be setup that way since E85 has much higher octane.


Now tuners, such as overkill, adjust timings to compensate. Your stock ECU.....i doubt it's looking for it or knows how to compensate unless the anti-knock detection is going off but that's 180 from what I believe is causing this coking.


Now the catch can, will keep the motors from ingesting a few ounces of oil which will keep the plugs cleaner over time, giving a better spark and true to life expectancy. Beyond that I can't speak much to how they really do us any good.

I believe it was Will at Overkill that stated there is two different octane maps in the stock ECU programming on the LFX. If you use 87 regular, the computer will retard the timing due to the higher knock counts. If you use at least mid-grade 89 or higher, the ECU will adjust accordingly and slightly advance the timing due to the lower knock counts of the higher octane fuel.

That's why I always use at least 89 octane. The engine just feels generally peppier and more eager to rev with 89, especially in high ambient temperature conditions.

Of course, as these engines coke up due to the nature of direct injection, the dilution of octane becomes more severe which causes the ECU to retard the timing.

However, I think this performance loss wouldn't be as severe if you used a higher octane from the beginning. Of course, eventually the intake valves will get so coked up where even the higher octane fuel won't be enough to provide good performance so a manual cleaning will be neccessary to restore full performance.
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Old 06-22-2018, 12:07 PM   #36
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During idle, at the last phase of the exhaust stroke, a little bit of exhaust gas is sucked back into the engine through the exhaust valve for the purposes of EGR. The EG lacks O2 and needs less fuel to combust the same volume of fresh air. This idle mix burns cooler because there is less energy being released. Is the EGR phase coking the intake valves because they stay cooler than the exhaust valves? Are my exhaust valves coked too? Who has aftermarket cams with coking pics?
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Old 06-22-2018, 08:16 PM   #37
Kenny Camaro
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Lighter foot! That’s a good one! Hahaha!!
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