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Old 09-01-2018, 03:20 PM   #1
inglopez19
 
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AC Compressor lines

Hello guys ! Any recommendations on how to replace the AC lines from the compressor from a 2010 Camaro V8 !




Thanks !
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Old 09-01-2018, 09:40 PM   #2
trodecke
 
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Unless you've got some fairly specialized equipment, your best bet is to take it to someone and let them do it. You'll need to evacuate the refrigerant as well as pull a vacuum before putting any refrigerant into it after you've replaced the lines. I watched a Youtube video where someone replaced his own compressor but had to purchase about $350 worth of tools just to make it happen. The vacuum was around $200 and the valves/gauges were around $80 I believe. There were some other things he had to purchase as well.
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Old 09-02-2018, 06:34 AM   #3
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AC repair is not a shadetree mechanic with a Crescent wrench task. It takes special tools, equipment and knowledge to fix a AC system.

That said, if the system has leaked out, bolting on new lines is a simple task. One nut on the condenser retains the high "hot" and high "condensed" pressure lines. One nut on the firewall retains the high and low side lines. The compressor has one bolt holding the lines against the back of it. When changing lines, always change the seals and lube them with PAG oil. Also, you should add an ounce or two of PAG oil with the new lines. Use the specific recommended PAG oil. Never, never, never, put any kind of leak stop sealer in a system. The system should be vacuumed down to spec, then filled with the specified weight of R134a. No more, no less, and none of that fancy can that promises super duper cold AC stuff found in every cheesy parts store. Just R134a and the specified PAG oil in the precise OEM specified quantities.

If you have a totally sealed system and it is vacuumed down, filled by weight, and all the components are working properly, it will cool properly and gauges for the low and high side will simply verify the performance. But without a vacuum pump and gauges, you are shooting in the dark.

IMO, AC repair can be learned from a book and the tools can be bought online. But this is a specialized field that is probably best taught in a classroom/shop setting.

AC repair and servicing tools, equipment and training is a long term investment. It's definitely not for the casual weekend mechanic. The tools can run from a few hundred dollars for some really basic things like a economy quality vacuum pump and gauges, to thousands for commercial quality equipment. If a guy maintains several cars in a family, a good book on AC repair and servicing, a set of gauges, a can tap, and a vacuum pump will go a long way. The book is the most valuable.
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:26 AM   #4
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I am in no way condoning my own hillbilly garage mechanics. But lines and compressors can be changed rather easily. As has been said, the lubricatimg and filling of the system should be left to the pros. That being said...I have never vacuumed a system. Always filled with recommended oil and refrigerant with single low side guage...and always had ice cold air. But that's just me.
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Old 09-02-2018, 01:52 PM   #5
inglopez19
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spurshot View Post
AC repair is not a shadetree mechanic with a Crescent wrench task. It takes special tools, equipment and knowledge to fix a AC system.

That said, if the system has leaked out, bolting on new lines is a simple task. One nut on the condenser retains the high "hot" and high "condensed" pressure lines. One nut on the firewall retains the high and low side lines. The compressor has one bolt holding the lines against the back of it. When changing lines, always change the seals and lube them with PAG oil. Also, you should add an ounce or two of PAG oil with the new lines. Use the specific recommended PAG oil. Never, never, never, put any kind of leak stop sealer in a system. The system should be vacuumed down to spec, then filled with the specified weight of R134a. No more, no less, and none of that fancy can that promises super duper cold AC stuff found in every cheesy parts store. Just R134a and the specified PAG oil in the precise OEM specified quantities.

If you have a totally sealed system and it is vacuumed down, filled by weight, and all the components are working properly, it will cool properly and gauges for the low and high side will simply verify the performance. But without a vacuum pump and gauges, you are shooting in the dark.

IMO, AC repair can be learned from a book and the tools can be bought online. But this is a specialized field that is probably best taught in a classroom/shop setting.




AC repair and servicing tools, equipment and training is a long term investment. It's definitely not for the casual weekend mechanic. The tools can run from a few hundred dollars for some really basic things like a economy quality vacuum pump and gauges, to thousands for commercial quality equipment. If a guy maintains several cars in a family, a good book on AC repair and servicing, a set of gauges, a can tap, and a vacuum pump will go a long way. The book is the most valuable.

I change the line already, really difficult one to change. Now waiting on somebody to do the vacuum to the lines. I didn't add the oil to the line.
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Old 09-02-2018, 02:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inglopez19 View Post
I change the line already, really difficult one to change. Now waiting on somebody to do the vacuum to the lines. I didn't add the oil to the line.

Call around to compare prices.
My sister recently had a friend change her compressor out and she had a shop lined up before he did so. It was under a c-note, like $85 IIRC. It didn't take them very long to do it.
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