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Old 01-04-2011, 09:09 PM   #1
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Melling oil pumps, difference between the High Pressure and High Volume models???

In the middle of doing a cam swap and considering upgrading the oil pump while I am in there. What is the difference between the high volume and high pressure Melling pumps and what would one use on a stock motor with the usual bolt-ons and cam. I know I have seen threads that suggest High Volume by why it and not the High Pressure.

Thanks in advance....
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Old 01-05-2011, 04:07 PM   #2
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Bump, I'm interested in this as well.
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Old 01-05-2011, 08:42 PM   #3
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A high volume pump means you are moving more oil with the same oil pump speed. If you do not have a larger than stock oil pan it makes no sense to have a high volume pump. You can actually pump the pan dry in some instances.

A high pressure pump has a stiffer spring on the pressure relief valve. Thus, the oil pump will generate more oil pressure before the relieve valve opens to maintain a certain pressure. I wouldn't recommend this type of pump either because it can put excessive pressure on main and rod bearings. Newer engines are built to much tighter tolerances and typically hold better oil pressure than older engines. Another problem with high pressure is that it will eat horsepower. Just think about it. Your putting more pressure on your rotating assembly as your rpms are increasing.

I would stick with a stock volume/pressure pump if you have a stock oil pan. This isn't an LS based engine, but I run a melling m-select high volume pump on my 406 small block. Reason being is that I have a 7 quart pan with a windage tray, internal baffling and a trap door in the sump. The pump generates a maximum of 50 psi of oil pressure with valvoline VR1 10w30 oil when the engine is fully warmed up at 180*.

If I were upgrading an LS based engine by doing a cam swap would spend the money solidifying the valve train with a set of roller or shaft mounted rocker arms. You will pick up more horsepower and will reduce the probability of a valve train failure at high rpm.
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Old 01-05-2011, 09:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 67ss&99ss View Post
A high volume pump means you are moving more oil with the same oil pump speed. If you do not have a larger than stock oil pan it makes no sense to have a high volume pump. You can actually pump the pan dry in some instances.

A high pressure pump has a stiffer spring on the pressure relief valve. Thus, the oil pump will generate more oil pressure before the relieve valve opens to maintain a certain pressure. I wouldn't recommend this type of pump either because it can put excessive pressure on main and rod bearings. Newer engines are built to much tighter tolerances and typically hold better oil pressure than older engines. Another problem with high pressure is that it will eat horsepower. Just think about it. Your putting more pressure on your rotating assembly as your rpms are increasing.

I would stick with a stock volume/pressure pump if you have a stock oil pan. This isn't an LS based engine, but I run a melling m-select high volume pump on my 406 small block. Reason being is that I have a 7 quart pan with a windage tray, internal baffling and a trap door in the sump. The pump generates a maximum of 50 psi of oil pressure with valvoline VR1 10w30 oil when the engine is fully warmed up at 180*.

If I were upgrading an LS based engine by doing a cam swap would spend the money solidifying the valve train with a set of roller or shaft mounted rocker arms. You will pick up more horsepower and will reduce the probability of a valve train failure at high rpm.
+1 on using a stock pump. High pressure pump could blow out your rear main or a couple other oil seals from the higher pressures. A high volume pump could suck your pan dry very quickly at high revs.
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Old 01-06-2011, 12:42 AM   #5
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We use the Melling Hv 10296 in most of our builds. We wont install a stock or ported shimmed stock pump in one of our engines. The OP is insurance, something to think about. If your spinning the engine at rpms more than normal it might be wise to look at the whole picture. We have never had an issue with the oil pan being sucked dry on a hi volume pump, we turn 7000 rpms with a 4.250 stroke LSx 457 all the time.
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Old 01-06-2011, 04:55 AM   #6
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Thanks for the feedback folks,, I think I will just stay with the stock pump for now. Even the shop I am dealing with said they really only consider swapping them to a Melling on a stock cube implementation if there are a lot of mikes on the car and they're doing a cam swap. Kind of like "the car has 60k miles and we're in there already".

Thanks again....
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Old 09-27-2011, 12:19 PM   #7
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Robertway i guess u havent seen my thread on stock pumps..imma try to locate it and give a heads up friend.
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Old 09-27-2011, 12:25 PM   #8
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http://www.camaro5.com/forums/showth...=162556&page=2 check this out..just my experience

every race inspired, or upgraded car has this melling swap done...there are many threads on here and other forums...our stock pumps are GARBAGE ..its not the pressure...they are prone to fail...they get jammed and die. this can happen any where, any time..do u wanna risk this. If u want to decrease pressure and worry about bearings etc...go a lighter oil..the new snys are so good that oil pressure isnt so much an issue, its oil flow that matters most....oil starvation will kill an engine quick...full oil pump failure will destroy the engine instantly unless u are lucky like i was....unless u shut it down right on the spot. I have yet to see any real race company or true race shop stay with a stock pump...get it done....my press at idle cold is about 50...then goes to slightly above 30 and at full hot is about 28...at 2k it goes to about 45, and stay about 55 at full rpms...do u think this too much?

Last edited by ipimpthisc; 09-27-2011 at 01:23 PM.
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Old 09-29-2011, 10:22 AM   #9
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I made the mistake of sticking with the stock oil pump on my cam swap...and what a mistake, luckily it failed when I was at idle in my garage. Tore the motor down to find the oil pump gears inside had seized. Installed a 10296 melling and all is good...
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